Brazile: Clinton Campaign Manager Robby Mook Was "Condescending And Dismissive"

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In her interview with Tucker Carlson, interim DNC chairwoman Donna Brazile revealed what it was like to work with Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Brazile said Mook was "condescending and dismissive" during the campaign.

"I come from the school, Tucker, that you actually knock on doors, you talk to people, you try to get their support, and then you try to get them out on election day," Brazile said, touting her 'old school' bonafides. "Robby comes from a school that is a lot different than the school I came from. They do algorithms, they do data modeling."

"It was dismissive," Brazile said of Mook's behavior. "Condescending and dismissive, those are the words I characterize in the book."





Transcript, via FOX News:

CARLSON: You haven't mentioned anybody who helped run the Hillary campaign. Robby Mook, for example. Would you hire him to run the next Democrat's campaign?

BRAZILE: Well, you know, Robby and I are both at Harvard. And one of things, when the Democrats win the popular vote and the Republicans win the Electoral College, people like us get to go up to Harvard and take a forensic examination of how we can improve our democracy. I went over to see Robbie last week.

I have great respect for Robby and his team but I was very complimentary of him in the book. I was very complimentary in the book.

(CROSSTALK)

CARLSON: I know you were and I want you to see what he is saying about you now on television. Here's part of it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ROBBY MOOK, FORMER CLINTON CAMPAIGN CHAIRMAN: The idea that the DNC could rake a contest, frankly, is laughable.

The allegations she's making are simply not true. We don’t -- certainly don't recognize the campaign she describes. We also don't recall some of the events she said that happened. I’m sure her publisher put her under a lot of pressure. I wish he just put her foot down and said, no, I’m not going to do this.

(END VIDEO CLIP)


CARLSON: So, he's describing you as a hapless pawn of your publisher.

(LAUGHTER)

BRAZILE: Well, you know, I’m the third of nine children and the one thing my parents taught us was to stand up, fight for ourselves, pray, and get up the next day.

Here's what I know: I was chair of the party, but more importantly I was an officer of the DNC. I’ve been a member of the Democratic National Committee since 1997. I know how things operate. I’m the former chair of the party.

So, to suggest to anyone that I don't know what I’m talking about, really -- I’m not focusing on what Robby is saying. I’m focusing on making sure that grassroots Democrats know that our party is going to become stronger.

You have to let these wounds heal. We had a very competitive primary. I don't know when the Republicans will sit down and heal their wounds, but we are healing our wounds, and we are going to learn how to become a stronger, more effective party.

CARLSON: So, here's part of what you say about Robby Mook in the book. You said and I’m quoting: I’ve worked with men all my life and politics, and I can sense when they get to this part about not being able to deal with the woman. It was not a racial thing, it was a gender thing. Every time you mentioned that, they are trying to shut you down because you are a woman, all of these guys are like, no, no, no, no, no.

So, my question is, did -- you are saying you were the victim of sexism from the management of the Hillary Clinton campaign. What was their response when you said, look, don't treat me differently because I’m a woman?

BRAZILE: Well, you know, I may have -- I may have also stated in the book, I think I did in three or four chapters, that it was also generational. Remember, I come from the old school. I come from the school when you have a three by five index card.

I come from the school, Tucker, that you actually knock on doors, you talk to people, you try to get their support, and then you try to get them out on election day.

Robby comes from a school that is a lot different than the school I came from. They do algorithms, they do data modeling, and what I would go come back to --

CARLSON: And they do sexism, too, apparently, from your book.

BRAZILE: And well, they --

CARLSON: Which is a little weird, since Hillary ran a whole campaign on breaking the glass ceiling and here's a guy running her campaign diminishing you because of your sex. It seems ironic maybe.

BRAZILE: No, you know, it was dismissive. Condescending and dismissive, those are the words I characterize in the book, because I came back and said, Robby, I just left Little Haiti, or Robby, I was in Cuyahoga County, or Robby, I just left Colorado, and I wanted the campaign to understand that. We needed yard signs. We needed radio spots.

You know, on August 19th, when Donald Trump said, what the hell do you have to lose? He made that comment in front of a black audience, here I was the chair of the party and last time I checked I am black, and I said, I want to respond. I had to write a column because I didn’t control my resources.

So, I was fighting, Tucker, for what I normally fight for in a campaign, whether I’m a campaign activist, or a campaign chairwoman, I am fighting for resources to get our message out, because my job was to help elect Hillary Clinton and Democrats from the courthouse all the way up to the United States House and Senate.

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