Biden: We Are Stronger Allied With Nations That Share Our Values As We Compete With China | Video | RealClearPolitics

Biden: We Are Stronger Allied With Nations That Share Our Values As We Compete With China

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President-elect Joe Biden said the United States should build coalitions with "like-minded partners" with shared interests in order to hold China's government accountable. In a speech Tuesday on foreign policy and national security, Biden said the country would be "stronger" flanked by nations that share U.S. values as we compete with China.

"As we compete with China to hold China's government accountable for its trade abuses, technology, human rights, and other fronts, our position would be much stronger when we build coalitions of like-minded partners and allies that make common cause with us in the defense of our shared interests and our shared values," Biden said today. "We make up only 25 percent--almost 25 percent of the entire economy of the world, but together with our democratic partners, we more than double our economic leverage."

"On any issue that matters to the U.S. and China relationship, from pursuing a foreign policy for the middle class including a trade and economic agenda that produces and protects American workers our intellectual prosperity and the environment to ensuring security of prosperity in the Indo Pacific region to championing human rights we are stronger and more effective when we are flanked by nations that share our vision and the future of our world," the president-elect said.


PRESIDENT-ELECT JOE BIDEN: We have learned so painfully this share the cost of being unprepared for a pandemic that leaps borders and circles the globe, for going to--if we are not investing with our partners around the world to strengthen the health systems everywhere, we are undermining our ability to permanently defeat COVID-19, and we are leaving ourselves vulnerable to the next deadly epidemic.

And as we compete with China to hold China's government accountable for its trade abuses, technology, human rights, and other fronts, our position would be much stronger when we build coalitions of like-minded partners and allies that make common cause with us in the defense of our shared interests and our shared values. We make up only 25 percent--almost 25 percent of the entire economy of the world, but together with our democratic partners, we more than double our economic leverage.

On any issue that matters to the U.S. and China relationship, from pursuing a foreign policy for the middle class including a trade and economic agenda that produces and protects American workers our intellectual prosperity and the environment to ensuring security of prosperity in the Indo Pacific region to championing human rights we are stronger and more effective when we are flanked by nations that share our vision and the future of our world.

That is how we multiply the impact of our efforts and make those efforts more sustainable. That is the power of smart, effective American leadership. But right now, there is an enormous vacuum. We are going to have to regain the trust and confidence of a world that has begun to find ways to work around us or work without us.

We also heard from key leaders of our intelligence and defense review teams, including Stephanie O'Sullivan, former principal deputy director of the National Intelligence, and retired Army Lieutenant General Karen Gibson. We talked about the different strategic challenges we are going to face from both Russia and China and the reforms we must make to put ourselves in the strongest possible position to meet those challenges.

That includes modernizing our defense priorities to better deter aggression in the future rather than continue--rather than continuing to overinvest in legacy systems designed to address threats of the past.
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