Warren: Bernie Sanders Was Against Plurality Of Voters Deciding Nominee in 2016 | Video | RealClearPolitics

Warren: Bernie Sanders Was Against Plurality Of Voters Deciding Nominee in 2016

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren criticized Sen. Bernie Sanders for his position that the candidate entering the convention with the most delegates should receive the nomination. At a CNN town hall Wednesday night, Warren said Sanders' position in 2016 was that the nomination should not go to the person who had a plurality of delegates.

Warren said she would continue her fight for the Democratic nomination even if another candidate came to the convention with a higher delegate count. The Senator cited she made "pinky promises" to little girls to persist as one reason she will stay in the race.

"I made the decision when I got in, I was not going to spend 70 percent of my time raising money from billionaires and corporate executives and lobbyists," she said. "I was going to spend 100 percent of my time with folks.  And I make my phone calls and phone calls, as other candidates do, and phone calls I make are to people who have pitched in $5 or $25."

"As long as they want me to stay in this race, I'm staying in this race. That and I have done pinky promises out there, so I have got to stay in this. I've told little girls we persist," Warren said.

DON LEMON, CNN HOST: Welcome back to our presidential town hall with Senator Elizabeth Warren. I want to get right to our voter questions right now. Let's bring in Jeffrey Korte, an associate professor at Medical University of South Carolina. He is currently leaning towards supporting you, Senator. Jeffrey?

SENATOR ELIZABETH WARREN: Keep leaning. OK, Jeffrey.

(LAUGHTER)

QUESTION: That's right. Thank you. Welcome to Charleston.

WARREN: Thank you. It's good to be here.

QUESTION:  During the Nevada debate, you and every other candidate on the stage, except for Bernie, hello somebody, indicated that the candidate with the plurality of delegates should not necessarily be the nominee. 
 
WARREN:  Uh-huh.
 
QUESTION:  This essentially means the will of the voters could be denied by the super delegates and the DNC, which is basically undemocratic, and in my opinion is a bunch of, bababooey (ph), to put it politely.  Can you explain why the will of the voters should not matter if no candidate reaches a majority of delegates?  
 
WARREN:  So you do know that was Bernie's position in 2016?  
 
(APPLAUSE)
 
QUESTION:  Not necessarily, no.  
 
WARREN:  Yes.  
 
QUESTION:  He won 22 states, so he went to the convention for voters.  
 
WARREN:  No, that was Bernie's position in 2016, that it should not go to the person who had a plurality.  So -- and remember, his last play was to super delegates. 
 
So, the way I see this is you write the rules before you know where everybody stands, and then you stick with those rules.  So, for me, Bernie had a big hand in writing these rules.  I didn't write them.  But Bernie did.  When we were putting -- they were putting together the 2016 platform for the Democratic Convention, those are the rules that he wanted to write and others wanted to write.  Everybody got in the race thinking that was the set of rules.  I don't see how come you get to change it just because he now thinks there is an advantage to him for doing that.  
 
(APPLAUSE)
 
LEMON:  I've got to follow that.  But I got the Howard reference and hey now, by the way, Jason. 
 
So listen, Senator Warren, to be clear, would you continue your fight for the Democratic nomination even if another candidate arrived at the convention ahead of you in the delegate count? 
 
WARREN:  Yes.  
 
LEMON:  You would continue, why?  
 
WARREN:  Because a lot of people made $5 contributions to my campaign to keep me in it.  In fact, after that last Democratic debate, a quarter of a million people came to elizabethwarren.com and said, we want you in this race.  We raised $9 million in three days from just folks who said, I'll pitch in $5 or $25.  They are the heart and soul of this race. 
 
I made the decision when I got in, I was not going to spend 70 percent of my time raising money from billionaires and corporate executives and lobbyists.  I was going to spend 100 percent of my time with folks.  And I make my phone calls and phone calls, as other candidates do, and phone calls I make are to people who have pitched in $5 or $25.
 
And as long as they want me to stay in this race, I'm staying in this race.  That and I have done pinky promises out there, so I have got to stay in this.  I've told little girls we persist. 




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