Christie: Warren Made Herself "Less Electable" With Medicare For All Plan | Video | RealClearPolitics

Christie: Warren Made Herself "Less Electable" With Medicare For All Plan

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Sunday on ABC's "This Week" roundtable, former N.J. Gov. Chris Christie and former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel bother agreed that Sen. Elizabeth Warren's "Medicare For All" plan is a political non-starter that will make her "less electable" in a general election.

"The biggest event of the week was Elizabeth Warren," Christie said. "She made herself less electable. Less electable by a big margin with what she did this week. She now owns this issue. She owns Medicare for All. Forget Bernie Sanders. It doesn't matter anymore. It's all Elizabeth Warren. And a third of her plan, a third of her plan, is based upon unexplained savings. $7 trillion on unexplained savings and the rest of it on tax increases, including, George, remember this, as a governor I'm sensitive to this, $6.1 trillion in added expenses to state governments."





"It's not going to happen," agreed Emanuel, who was President Obama's chief of staff when Obamacare passed. "When we had 58 Democratic senators, we couldn't get a public option."

"Let me tell you how the president's going to play this," Christie explained. "Those very people, the operating engineers, the carpenters, the ironworkers, the steelworkers, who have good private health plans through their union, are going to -- he's going to go to them and say, she is taking away your health care. And that's -- where do those folks live? Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio. This is a huge problem and a great opportunity for the president."

RAHM EMANUEL: Well, look, I think when you look at the poll that came out, basically voters are still unsure. They're not anchored to any candidate. And this is an incredibly fluid race. And I will say -- I will predict that one of the candidates coming out what will be called the second tier, although I don't think that's a good term, are going to come out and emerge and surprise people and have a ticket on the train out of Iowa.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You mean even the ones at 2 and 1 percent right?

EMANUEL: Yes. Because here's the thing, it was Nate did this earlier, John Kerry was poling at 5 or 4 percent. I think people are looking not ideologically who is the best person to beat Donald Trump, that is the ideological North Star for Democrats. And they're still in the hunt trying to figure out who that is.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Well, our poll shows on that number it's still Joe Biden, but he seems to be falling on all the other qualities.

CHRIS CHRISTIE: Well, but no, but also strong leader. He comes through well ahead of any of the other people on strong leader. So, if you're looking at Rahm's philosophy here who can beat Donald Trump and being strong, who can stand up to Donald Trump on that debate stage, Biden is still well ahead like 2-1 over either Warren or Sanders and even more over Mayor Pete. But the biggest event of the week was Elizabeth Warren because made herself less electable. Less electable by a big margin with what she did this week. She now owns this issue. She owns Medicare for All, forget Bernie Sanders. It doesn't matter anymore. It's all Elizabeth Warren. And a third of her plan, a third of her plan, is based upon unexplained savings. $7 trillion on unexplained savings and the rest of it on tax increases, including, George, remember this, as a governor I'm sensitive to this, $6.1 trillion in added expenses to state governments. You know what that's going to mean for everybody out there? Higher middle class taxes that are going to be passed not by the federal governments, but by state governments, because they're going to have to pay this tab for the feds...

STEPHANOPOULOS: Rahm, you didn't mince any words in "The Washington Post" this week. You called it a pipe dream.

EMANUEL: Yes. Well, look, here's the thing. She was drafting behind Bernie. This was Bernie's idea. And now she owns this idea. And what she did today is take it from a health care idea to a tax idea. And that is not a place you want to be. And I still believe every argument about the -- not about 2 percent on people earning about $50 million or some type of corruption issue. If this issue is not going to happen -- and it's not the way you actually argue health care. Having done the ACA for Obama, kids health care for President Clinton, the re-importation of pharmaceutical products in the House, when we beat Tom DeLay, the politics of this is, she's making this more difficult than it needs to be on the very issue of cost control.

It is a pipe dream. You are not -- we couldn't get -- when we had 58 who were Democratic senators, we couldn't get a public option. What makes you think -- and I say this in the piece -- give me the nine Republicans that are going to vote for Medicare for all, and I will declare New York pizza better than Chicago pizza.

(LAUGHTER)

EMANUEL: And it's not going to happen.

CHRISTIE: And, George, remember something else. When you start to look through the specifics of her plan, one of the things she says is, $1.4 trillion in higher taxes -- in more taxes, because people aren't going to be paying for premiums, where they're going to pay it to the government.

I'm going to ask people out there if they really think the government has ever run anything more efficiently and effectively than the private sector has. And you start paying that, those are middle-class people who are going to be paying more money than they're paying in premiums right now.

EMANUEL: Here's the problem for Democrats.

If you make -- we're believed on health care by 20 percent. If we fail on health care, fail, then our base gets depressed. They don't turn out in the midterms. They don't turn in the next elections. And you're going to -- all the other things we want to do on climate change, education, social justice, all fly by the wayside...

CHRISTIE: Let me tell you how the president's going to play this. Those very people, the operating engineers, the carpenters, the ironworkers, the steelworkers, who have good private health plans through their union, are going to -- he's going to go to them and say, she is taking away your health care. And that's -- where do those folks live? Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio. This is a huge problem and a great opportunity for the president.

STEPHANOPOULOS: I see Rahm nodding his head, but we're out of time right now.

(LAUGHTER)

EMANUEL: I'll say this -- this is a battle now between revolution vs. reform.

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