Andrew McCabe: The Time Has Come For Congress To Pursue A Dedicated Impeachment Inquiry

|

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe said Thursday he feels strongly that Congress should "step up to the plate and do their job" and impeach President Donald Trump.

"I feel strongly that that's the same position Congress is in now, and they should step up to the plate and do their job," McCabe said Thursday on CNN. "It doesn't mean that the president will be removed from office or should be removed from office or will be impeached, but it is absolutely clear to me that the time has come for Congress to pursue a dedicated impeachment inquiry."





"I think it would solidify their position legally as they begin the process of going into court to fight over access to witnesses, and it would provide a more coordinated and coherent approach to having other witnesses come in and testify," McCabe added.

McCabe also expressed his frustration that Mueller "didn't really push back" on "misrepresentations" that Congressional Republicans laid out at the hearings. He concluded that the Mueller report is "the best answer" to the question of why there was an investigation.

"I think what for me was one of the more frustrating moments of the director's testimony, he really didn't really push back on many of those false narratives or misrepresentations of fact that you heard, and the conspiracy theories and other things that the Republicans laid out there yesterday," he said.

ALISYN CAMEROTA, CNN HOST: Andy McCabe, I just want to steak with you for one more second, because we had spoken to you earlier in the week, and you had been involved in helping in the past to prepare Robert Mueller for some of the these briefings, and you talked about the impeccable preparation that he went through, and reams of briefing books, et cetera. And look, his performance has been so dissected over the past 16 hours I don't want to engage in too much of it, but only because you've been there, before and after, just want to know what you saw in terms of his preparation.

ANDREW MCCABE, FMR. FBI DEPUTY DIRECTOR: Yes, Alisyn, I don't doubt that he went through that same sort of preparation this time. But you have to remember that this was a very different appearance than anyone, certainly that I've ever been involved helping Director Mueller get ready for. I'm quite sure this is the first time he's testified after having already provided a 400- page statement, essentially, to the world. So it's pretty clear to me that he did not want to take any chance of anyone from either side mischaracterizing or summarizing his report and his prior statement in any way differently than he had presented in the report. So I feel like he went into it with a unbelievably high degree of caution. You could see from the way he answered a question, he won't agree to a single thing unless it was a direct quote from the report itself. He asked repeatedly for the cites that people were referring to. I think he was just, you could say, overly cautious about not wanting to change any of the phrasing from the way it appeared in the report.

BERMAN: Andy, can I ask you, because when you look that key facts, the things that came out of yesterday, and Alisyn has been reading this all morning. I'll take over and do it right now. It came out yesterday, Robert Mueller confirmed, that the president, then candidate Trump, welcomed Russian interference and then lied about it. Generally, Trump's written answers were untruthful. Trump, the encouraging of WikiLeaks during the campaign was problematic, and he went onto say that's an understatement, that he was not exonerated from obstruction. He fears, Robert Mueller does, that accepting help is the new normal, and he was not seeking a job as FBI director as the president has falsely claimed.

My question to you is, again, this morning, if all of those things are not enough to push the Democrats toward impeachment, does that frustrate you? As someone who was in the middle of it all and someone who is now looking for Congress to take action, is it frustrating to you that you can have that list there and have it not necessarily be enough?

MCCABE: It's baffling to me, John. From my own experience at the very beginnings of this investigation we confronted some very hard choices, choices that we knew would have negative repercussions on our organization and on us personally, and we made those choices anyway because it was our job and duty to do so.

I feel strongly that that's the same position Congress is in now, and they should step up to the plate and do their job. It doesn't mean that the president will be removed from office or should be removed from office or will be impeached, but it is absolutely clear to me that the time has come for Congress to pursue a dedicated impeachment inquiry. I think it would solidify their position legally as they begin the process of going into court to fight over access to witnesses, and it would provide a more coordinated and coherent approach to having other witnesses come in and testify.

Comment
Show comments Hide Comments

Latest Political Videos

Video Archives