CNN's Alisyn Camerota: Trump Administration "Has Broken My Spirit," Laws Are Broken But Nothing Happens

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During a CNN panel discussion Monday morning, anchor Alisyn Camerota expressed "exhaustion" with covering the Trump administration, saying it had "broken [her] spirit" to see the president accused of a long list of crimes but "nothing happens."

"I'm sorry if I sound like they've broken my spirit," the CNN "New Day" host said. "The reason I say that is because you see in the Mueller report ample evidence laid out of obstruction, of what Robert Mueller considered obstruction, but nothing happens. You see violations of the Emoluments Clause, but nothing happens. You see nepotism, but nothing happens.





"At this point, I think there is a feeling of -- I don't know -- exhaustion, I guess," Camerota lamented.

"People generally like an outcome," she said. "I speak for all Americans when I say that."

"I mean, look, you can't just say this movie is getting exhausting and boring. I'm going to turn the channel. It's not a reality show," CNN legal analyst John Avlon said. "This is real life."

"It's never boring," Camerota said.

ALISYN CAMEROTA: I guess my point, John, and I'm sorry if I sound like they've broken my spirit. However --

JOHN BERMAN: But that's what it sounds like. But I think that's the goal, too.

CAMEROTA: Well, it's worked. Because I think that I am channeling many members of the American public who feel that these past two years have been disheartening for people who believe in justice.

Between -- I mean, and the reason I say that is because you see in the Mueller report ample evidence laid out of obstruction, of what Robert Mueller considered obstruction, but nothing happens. You see violations of the Emoluments Clause, but nothing happens. You see nepotism, but nothing happens.

JOHN AVLON: Well, the emoluments -- the emoluments issue is going forward in the courts.

CAMEROTA: Fine. I'm saying that at this point, I think there is a feeling of -- I don't know -- exhaustion, I guess, from -- We know this from polls. We know this from voters turning away after the Mueller report, that they think that Congress is going to continue this, and there will be more legalese and there will be more nuance. But I'm just not sure to what end.

AVLON: I mean, to the end of checks and balances and a functioning democratic republic. I mean, you know --

CAMEROTA: You and your details.

LOCKHART: There's that. The Constitution.

AVLON: I just -- you know -- I mean, look, you can't just say this movie is getting exhausting and boring. I'm going to turn the channel. It's not a reality show.

CAMEROTA: It's never boring.

AVLON: This is real life. Never boring.

Look, I think there are questioning about congressional strategy, right? What hill to fight and die on. Was Jerry Nadler right to sort of, you know, focus on the outside -- you know, the congressional -- outside counsel or inside counsel asking Barr questions that created the stand-off yesterday.

McGahn is obviously a key witness in getting more information. And obviously, Joe is right about the optics and the politicization of it, as well.

Bob Mueller is really -- the testimony that everyone is going to be watching to get clarity on the report.

CAMEROTA: Well, sure.

AVLON: And Barr, we know, is an unreliable narrator, to put it mildly.

The real focus should be, though, on the ongoing House investigations into, for example, Trump finances and the potential connections with, you know, Russians and, you know, allegations of money laundering which they have said they're going to pursue, that the Mueller report apparently did not. Open questions about which Florida county was hacked by the Russians.

CAMEROTA: Sure.

AVLON: Cambridge Analytica. There are plenty of open questions that are meaningful.

BERMAN: Why should focus be -- If Robert Mueller laid out ten cases --

CAMEROTA: Yes.

BERMAN: -- where he thinks there's evidence of obstruction of justice, why shouldn't Congress, which is the only body -- everyone seems to agree on now -- the only body that can do anything over this or has any oversight over it. Why shouldn't they get involved? Why shouldn't they hear testimony --

[06:10:11] CAMEROTA: Because people generally like an outcome.

BERMAN: Who's "they"?

CAMEROTA: I speak for all Americans when I say that.

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