Kellyanne Conway Blasts CNN's Dana Bash For Asking About Husband's Tweets

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CNN's Dana Bash and Kellyanne Conway debate about tweets critical of President Trump from Conway's husband.

"It's fascinating that CNN would go there but very good for the whole world to have just witnessed that it is now fair game what people's — how people's spouses and significant others may differ with them. I'm really surprised and gratified to see that," Kellyanne Conway said in response.

"I would ask you that if you were a man," Bash replied, to which Kellyanne Conway said: "No you would not."





Conway said: "This is a fascinating cross the Rubicon moment. And I will leave it at that."

(Full interview here)




BASH: Kellyanne, we're almost -- we're almost out of time.

I just ask you one question that a lot of people are asking me, probably you too. And that is, what is up with your husband's tweets?

Your husband is a very well-respected lawyer, and he's been sending some tweets that have been critical of the administration.

Just an example, in response to a tweet he saw saying President Trump's aides are reluctant to speak for him because he contradicts them, later, your husband wrote: "So true. It's absurd."

CONWAY: He writes a lot of things that are also supportive, and he writes a lot of things about corgis and Philadelphia Eagles and sports, too.

But the fact is that -- well, two things I will say to you.

Number one, that, again, that woman who lost the election whose name I never see on TV anymore is wrong that women -- I think she said white women have to listen to their -- the men in their life to -- to form their own political opinions. Wrong again, lady.

Number two, it's fascinating to me that CNN would go there. But it's very good for the whole world to have just witnessed that it's now fair... game how people's spouses and significant others may differ with them.

I'm really surprised, but very, in some ways, relieved and gratified to see that.

BASH: No.

CONWAY: That should really be fun.

BASH: No, I actually -- first of all, I would ask you that if you were a man and your wife...

CONWAY: No, you wouldn't.

(CROSSTALK)

BASH: A thousand percent, I would.

CONWAY: No, no, no, no, no.

(CROSSTALK)

BASH: And it's not about that. It's about -- it's about -- it's about questioning -- publicly questioning what you are doing for a living and with regard to your boss.

And it has nothing to do with your gender, and it has...

CONWAY: No, and it has nothing to do with my spouse.

BASH: Right. That's...

(CROSSTALK)

BASH: ... just asking.

(CROSSTALK)

CONWAY: Oh, no, no, no, you just brought him -- you just brought him into this, so this ought to be fun moving forward, Dana.

BASH: OK.

CONWAY: We're now going to talk about other people's -- people's spouses and significant others, just because they either work in the White House or at CNN?

Are we going to do that? Because you just -- no, you just went there.

BASH: Yes. Yes.

CONWAY: CNN just went there.

Look, differences of opinions...

(CROSSTALK)

BASH: By the way, this wasn't critical. I'm just asking about...

CONWAY: Oh, of course it was.

It was meant to harass and embarrass. But let me just tell you something.

BASH: Absolutely not.

CONWAY: Let me just tell you something.

By definition, spouses have a difference of opinion when adultery is happening.

BASH: I could not agree more.

CONWAY: By definition, spouses have a difference of opinion when one is, I don't know, draining the joint bank account to support things that maybe the other disagrees with.

So, this is a fascinating cross the Rubicon moment. And I will leave it at that.

BASH: OK.

Well, that certainly was not intended to cross any Rubicon. It was actually intended to be somewhat lighthearted about the fact that we are all grownups who have different opinions.

But I'm sorry that you took it that...

CONWAY: That isn't what you said.

You said, I have got to ask you a question that is on everybody's mind.

BASH: Yes, it is. It is. It is. I'm sure you -- I'm sure you hear it too. It is.

And it is hard to have -- to have two adults in -- in a situation like this, but it is unusual for...

(CROSSTALK)

CONWAY: I'm sorry. What does that mean?

BASH: It is unusual for...

CONWAY: I'm sorry. It's hard for whom? I'm sorry. Back it up.

(CROSSTALK)

CONWAY: It's hard for the two adults. My husband and me?

BASH: You and your husband. My point is that...

CONWAY: Now you're talking about my marriage again?

BASH: I'm not talking about your marriage.

CONWAY: Yes.

(CROSSTALK)

CONWAY: ... my husband.

BASH: Kellyanne, Kellyanne, here was my whole point in this...

CONWAY: It's hard for whom?

BASH: ... is that you are a professional working for the president of the United States, and your husband is a very well-respected lawyer. And my point is, is that we don't often see -- in fact, I don't remember the last time we saw somebody working for the president in a high-profile position when their spouse is saying critical things about them.

That is all. That is all.

CONWAY: Well, that, A, is not true. There are other family members whose -- of people who work at the White House who certainly don't support the president privately and publicly.

But I will tell you this. And there are people who have been in his administration who worked for Democrats or gave money to Democrats.

But all that aside, that really is meant to divert attention from, again, the big issues that America cares about.

But, like I said, CNN chose to go there. I think that's going to be fascinating moving forward. And don't deny that, when you just said it must be difficult.

I do want you to clarify, though, for the whole worldwide audience -- and, in fact, for me, since you raised me -- it's -- quote -- "difficult" for whom to have two adults what?

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