Bernie Sanders vs. Hillary Clinton on Wall Street Bailout Support: "Excuse Me, I'm Talking"

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From Sunday's Democratic debate in Flint, Michigan moderated by CNN:

SANDERS: I am very glad, Anderson, that secretary Clinton discovered religion on this issue but it's a little bit too late.

Secretary Clinton supported virtually every one of the disastrous trade agreements written by corporate America.

(APPLAUSE)

NAFTA, supported by the Secretary cost, us 800,000 jobs nationwide, tens of thousands of jobs in the Midwest. Permanent normal trade relations with China cost us millions of jobs. Look, I was on a picket line in early 1990's against NFATA because you didn't need a PhD in economics to understand that American workers should not be forced to compete against people in Mexico making 25 cents an hour.

(APPLAUSE)

SANDERS: And the reason that I was one of the first, not one of the last to be in opposition to the TPP is that American workers --

(APPLAUSE)

-- should not be forced to compete against people in Vietnam today making a minimum wage of $0.65 an hour. Look, what we have got to do is tell corporate America that they cannot continue to shut down. We've lost 60,000 factories since 2001. They're going to start having to, if I'm president, invest in this country -- not in China, not in Mexico.

COOPER: Secretary Clinton?

(APPLAUSE)

CLINTON: Well -- well, I'll tell you something else that Senator Sanders was against. He was against the auto bailout. In January of 2009, President-Elect Obama asked everybody in the Congress to vote for the bailout.

The money was there, and had to be released in order to save the American auto industry and four million jobs, and to begin the restructuring. We had the best year that the auto industry has had in a long time. I voted to save the auto industry.

(APPLAUSE)

He voted against the money that ended up saving the auto industry. I think that is a pretty big difference.

SANDERS: Well, I -- If you are talking about the Wall Street bailout, where some of your friends destroyed this economy --

CLINTON: You know --

SANDERS: -- through -- excuse me, I'm talking.

COOPER: Let him (ph) (inaudible).

(APPLAUSE)

(CROSSTALK)

CLINTON: If you're going to talk, tell the whole story, Senator Sanders.

SANDERS: Let me tell my story. You tell yours.

CLINTON: I will.

SANDERS: Your story is for -- voting for every disastrous trade agreement, and voting for corporate America. Did I vote against the Wall Street bailout?

When billionaires on Wall Street destroyed this economy, they went to Congress and they said, "please, we'll be good boys, bail us out." You know what I said? I said, "let the billionaires themselves bail out Wall Street." It shouldn't be the middle class of this country.

(APPLAUSE)

CLINTON: OK, so --

COOPER: Secretary Clinton?

SANDERS: Wait a minute. Wait. Could I finish? You'll have your turn, all right?

But ultimately, if you look at our records, I stood up to corporate America time and time again. I went to Mexico. I saw the lives of people who were working in American factories and making $0.25 an hour.

I understood that these trade agreements were going to destroy the middle class of this country. I led the fight against us (sic). That is one of the major differences that we have.

COOPER: Secretary Clinton.

CLINTON: Well, if I -- if I could --

(APPLAUSE)

-- to set the record straight, I voted against the only multinational trade agreement that came before me when I was in the Senate. It was called CAFTA. I came out against the TPP after it was finished. I thought it was reasonable to actually know what was in it before I opposed it. I oppose it.

(APPLAUSE)

Now let me get back to what happened in January of 2009. The Bush administration negotiated the deal. Were there things in it that I didn't like? Would I have done it differently? Absolutely. But was the auto bailout money in it -- the $350 billion that was

needed to begin the restructuring of the auto industry? Yes, it was. So when I talk about Senator Sanders being a one-issue candidate, I mean very clearly -- you have to make hard choices when you're in positions of responsibility. The two senators from Michigan stood on the floor and said, "we have to get this money released." I went with them, and I went with Barack Obama. You did not. If everybody had voted the way he did, I believe the auto industry would have collapsed, taking four million jobs with it.

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