Topics
Administration
Congress
Democrats
Elections
Ethics
Governor -- Alabama
Governor -- Alaska
Governor -- Arizona
Governor -- California
Governor -- Colorado
Governor -- Connecticut
Governor -- Delaware
Governor -- Florida
Governor -- Georgia
Governor -- Hawaii
Governor -- Illinois
Governor -- Indiana
Governor -- Iowa
Governor -- Kentucky
Governor -- Louisiana
Governor -- Maryland
Governor -- Massachusetts
Governor -- Michigan
Governor -- Minnesota
Governor -- Missouri
Governor -- Montana
Governor -- Nevada
Governor -- New Hampshire
Governor -- New Jersey
Governor -- New Mexico
Governor -- New York
Governor -- North Carolina
Governor -- North Dakota
Governor -- Ohio
Governor -- Oregon
Governor -- Pennsylvania
Governor -- Rhode Island
Governor -- South Carolina
Governor -- Texas
Governor -- Utah
Governor -- Vermont
Governor -- Virginia
Governor -- Washington
Governor -- Wyoming
Governors
Health Care
House
House -- Alabama -- 02
House -- Alabama -- 03
House -- Alabama -- 05
House -- Alaska
House -- Arizona -- 01
House -- Arizona -- 03
House -- Arizona -- 05
House -- Arizona -- 08
House -- Arkansas -- 01
House -- Arkansas -- 02
House -- California -- 04
House -- California -- 12
House -- California -- 26
House -- California -- 32
House -- California -- 50
House -- Colorado -- 02
House -- Colorado -- 04
House -- Connecticut -- 04
House -- Connecticut -- 05
House -- Florida -- 06
House -- Florida -- 08
House -- Florida -- 13
House -- Florida -- 15
House -- Florida -- 16
House -- Florida -- 18
House -- Florida -- 19
House -- Florida -- 21
House -- Florida -- 24
House -- Florida -- 25
House -- Georgia -- 05
House -- Georgia -- 10
House -- Georgia -- 12
House -- Idaho -- 01
House -- Illinois -- 01
House -- Illinois -- 03
House -- Illinois -- 05
House -- Illinois -- 06
House -- Illinois -- 10
House -- Illinois -- 11
House -- Illinois -- 14
House -- Illinois -- 18
House -- Indiana -- 03
House -- Indiana -- 07
House -- Indiana -- 09
House -- Iowa -- 03
House -- Iowa -- 04
House -- Kansas -- 02
House -- Kentucky -- 02
House -- Kentucky -- 03
House -- Louisiana -- 01
House -- Louisiana -- 02
House -- Louisiana -- 04
House -- Louisiana -- 06
House -- Maine -- 01
House -- Maryland -- 01
House -- Maryland -- 04
House -- Massachusetts -- 05
House -- Michigan -- 01
House -- Michigan -- 07
House -- Michigan -- 09
House -- Michigan -- 13
House -- Minnesota -- 01
House -- Minnesota -- 03
House -- Minnesota -- 06
House -- Mississippi -- 01
House -- Mississippi -- 03
House -- Missouri -- 09
House -- Nevada -- 02
House -- Nevada -- 03
House -- New Hampshire -- 01
House -- New Hampshire -- 02
House -- New Jersey -- 03
House -- New Jersey -- 05
House -- New Jersey -- 07
House -- New Mexico -- 01
House -- New Mexico -- 02
House -- New York -- 13
House -- New York -- 15
House -- New York -- 20
House -- New York -- 21
House -- New York -- 23
House -- New York -- 24
House -- New York -- 25
House -- New York -- 26
House -- New York -- 29
House -- North Carolina -- 03
House -- North Carolina -- 08
House -- North Carolina -- 10
House -- North Dakota
House -- Ohio -- 01
House -- Ohio -- 02
House -- Ohio -- 05
House -- Ohio -- 07
House -- Ohio -- 10
House -- Ohio -- 15
House -- Ohio -- 16
House -- Oklahoma -- 05
House -- Oregon -- 05
House -- Pennsylvania -- 03
House -- Pennsylvania -- 04
House -- Pennsylvania -- 06
House -- Pennsylvania -- 10
House -- Pennsylvania -- 11
House -- Pennsylvania -- 12
House -- Pennsylvania -- 15
House -- South Carolina -- 01
House -- South Carolina -- 02
House -- South Carolina -- 05
House -- South Dakota
House -- Tennessee -- 07
House -- Tennessee -- 08
House -- Tennessee -- 09
House -- Texas -- 07
House -- Texas -- 10
House -- Texas -- 14
House -- Texas -- 22
House -- Utah -- 03
House -- Virginia -- 01
House -- Virginia -- 05
House -- Virginia -- 09
House -- Virginia -- 11
House -- Washington -- 08
House -- West Virginia -- 02
House -- Wisconsin -- 08
House -- Wyoming
Inauguration 2009
International
Issues
Judiciary
Local Elections
Media
Miscellaneous
Morning Thoughts
Politics Weekly
Polls
Rankings
Republicans
Senate
Senate -- Alaska
Senate -- Arizona
Senate -- Arkansas
Senate -- California
Senate -- Colorado
Senate -- Connecticut
Senate -- Delaware
Senate -- Florida
Senate -- Georgia
Senate -- Idaho
Senate -- Illinois
Senate -- Indiana
Senate -- Iowa
Senate -- Kansas
Senate -- Kentucky
Senate -- Louisiana
Senate -- Maine
Senate -- Massachusetts
Senate -- Minnesota
Senate -- Mississippi
Senate -- Missouri
Senate -- Montana
Senate -- Nebraska
Senate -- Nevada
Senate -- New Hampshire
Senate -- New Jersey
Senate -- New Mexico
Senate -- New York
Senate -- North Carolina
Senate -- North Dakota
Senate -- Ohio
Senate -- Oklahoma
Senate -- Oregon
Senate -- Pennsylvania
Senate -- South Carolina
Senate -- South Dakota
Senate -- Tennessee
Senate -- Texas
Senate -- Utah
Senate -- Virginia
Senate -- Wisconsin
Senate -- Wyoming
Sports
Supreme Court
WH 08
WH 08 -- Democrats
WH 08 -- Republicans
WH 12
WH 12 -- Republicans
White House

 

« This Week On PN Radio | Blog Home Page | Vito In, Or Out »

Strategy Memo: Moving On

Good Monday morning. The storm system that hit the Midwest this weekend is blowing through Washington at the moment, and campaign events in West Virginia could be rained out as a result. Here's what a wet Washington is watching today:

-- The Senate today meets for a period of morning business, with no roll call votes planned. The House has a pro forma session scheduled as well. Two days after seeing his daughter married, President Bush is back at the White House, where he will hand out Preserve America Presidential Awards in the Rose Garden. Vice President Cheney will rally the troops in Mississippi on behalf of Republican congressional candidate Greg Davis, a measure of just how conservative that district is.

-- A day before West Virginia's crucial (we jest) primary, in which twenty-eight delegates will likely go heavily for Hillary Clinton, the New York Senator will spend her time in the Mountain State. As evidence of his commitment, or lack thereof, Barack Obama has one stop in West Virginia today before quickly jetting off to Louisville, Kentucky, in advance of next week's primary. Obama's performance might begin to worry some of his advisers -- West Virginia is to Democrats as Ohio is to Republicans: If the candidate doesn't win the state, they're not winning the White House. And, the Financial Times reports, of the twenty-something people interviewed at a rally with Bill Clinton, none would say they'd vote for Obama in November, were he the nominee. The question to be determined: Is it Obama's problem if he loses the state to John McCain, or is it more evidence that the state is becoming like Alabama or North Carolina (willing to vote Democratic locally, but not federally)?

-- Why won't those voters back Obama in November? It's a Republican's dream, with voters citing flag pins and Jeremiah Wright and religions other than their own (one would think those last two are mutually exclusive). But as John McCain and Clinton continue to not bedeck themselves in flag memorabilia (Most of the media doesn't either, even as they ask Obama and his surrogates about the "issue;" campaign communications director Robert Gibbs pointed that out to the MSNBC gang this morning. None of the four people on set had pins on.), and as Obama maintains serious distance between himself and Wright, one has to consider that some voters may just be looking for an excuse to vote against Obama. McCain can't touch any of those controversies with a ten-foot pole, and he won't, but he's already benefiting from a bank of voters who just won't consider Obama.

-- Meanwhile, it's pretty obvious that Obama's got the nomination all wrapped up. Clinton will do well in West Virginia and in Kentucky, which votes a week from tomorrow, while Obama's probably got a healthy lead in Oregon. But with just over 130 delegates available in all three of those states combined, even then it's not enough for Clinton to catch up. Too, it's hard to continue a campaign that's $20 million in debt, as communications director Howard Wolfson said Clinton's is, per the Washington Post's Anne Kornblut. Still, maybe wins in the two Appalachian states help Clinton retire those campaign debts and exit the race with her head held high and her status in the Democratic Party largely intact. Most Clinton advisers, Kornblut writes, are privately asking the when, not if, question.

-- Obama continues to maintain that Clinton can stay in the race as long as she wants, but he's already looking ahead to November. Missouri proved crucial in both 2000 and 2004, and though their primary happened way back on Super Tuesday (a narrow Obama win, after a call reversal by the AP), Obama will hold a town hall meeting on economic issues in the state this coming Tuesday, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch learned in an interview with Senator Claire McCaskill, one of Obama's biggest backers. An ironic footnote: Obama will head to Cape Girardeau, birthplace of the man whose Operation Chaos might have delivered Indiana's narrow margin to Clinton, Rush Limbaugh.

-- Obama and McCain are already turning toward each other and targeting important blocs of voters, primarily independents and Latino voters, the New York Times wrote yesterday. And the two may even campaign together; McCain's team floated the idea of joint town halls last week, and this weekend in Oregon Obama called the concept "a great idea." But the battle will come down to traditional battlegrounds, like Ohio and Pennsylvania, as well as a newly-competitive field atop and west of the Rocky Mountains. And despite promises of a high-minded campaign, both already have ads defining their opponents shot, chopped and ready to go. Per the ads, Obama is young and inexperienced and McCain represents the third term of the most unpopular president in history.

-- John McCain is out west to start the week, stumping in Oregon and Washington State where he will unveil his views on environmental issues and climate change (a mixed record, the Post writes today). Throughout the campaign, McCain has spent time on climate change issues, and that may put the two Northwest states in play, if not in McCain's column. Remember, despite a liberal reputation, three of Oregon's five districts are Republican-leaning, and Al Gore won the state by just 7,000 votes out of a few more than 1.4 million cast. John Kerry did little better, winning by just four points. If Obama has to spend time on the West Coast for anything other than fundraising come October, that could be a sign McCain has the race completely wrapped up.

-- Word Of The Day: Now entering the political lexicon: Saltergram. In response to a Newsweek story that he saw as a little harsh on the GOP ("The Republican Party has been successfully scaring voters since 1968, when Richard Nixon built a Silent Majority out of lower- and middle-class folks frightened or disturbed by hippies and student radicals and blacks rioting in the inner cities."), top McCain aide Mark Salter fired off an angry letter to Newsweek chief Jon Meacham, as Jonathan Martin reports. Salter has long been closer to McCain than virtually anyone else, but he's gaining prominence and taking some heat off his candidate. If Karl Rove was Bush's Brain, maybe Salter is McCain's Temper. Perhaps that would absolve the candidate of having to demonstrate his own.

-- Today On The Trail: Politickin' in West Virginia, Clinton hits events in Montgomery, Clear Fork, Logan and Fairmont. Obama stops in Charleston for a rally before heading to a similar event in Louisville. And John McCain starts his day with an economic speech in Portland.