Topics
Administration
Congress
Democrats
Elections
Ethics
Governor -- Alabama
Governor -- Alaska
Governor -- Arizona
Governor -- California
Governor -- Colorado
Governor -- Connecticut
Governor -- Delaware
Governor -- Florida
Governor -- Georgia
Governor -- Hawaii
Governor -- Illinois
Governor -- Indiana
Governor -- Iowa
Governor -- Kentucky
Governor -- Louisiana
Governor -- Maryland
Governor -- Massachusetts
Governor -- Michigan
Governor -- Minnesota
Governor -- Missouri
Governor -- Montana
Governor -- Nevada
Governor -- New Hampshire
Governor -- New Jersey
Governor -- New Mexico
Governor -- New York
Governor -- North Carolina
Governor -- North Dakota
Governor -- Ohio
Governor -- Oregon
Governor -- Pennsylvania
Governor -- Rhode Island
Governor -- South Carolina
Governor -- Texas
Governor -- Utah
Governor -- Vermont
Governor -- Virginia
Governor -- Washington
Governor -- Wyoming
Governors
Health Care
House
House -- Alabama -- 02
House -- Alabama -- 03
House -- Alabama -- 05
House -- Alaska
House -- Arizona -- 01
House -- Arizona -- 03
House -- Arizona -- 05
House -- Arizona -- 08
House -- Arkansas -- 01
House -- Arkansas -- 02
House -- California -- 04
House -- California -- 12
House -- California -- 26
House -- California -- 32
House -- California -- 50
House -- Colorado -- 02
House -- Colorado -- 04
House -- Connecticut -- 04
House -- Connecticut -- 05
House -- Florida -- 06
House -- Florida -- 08
House -- Florida -- 13
House -- Florida -- 15
House -- Florida -- 16
House -- Florida -- 18
House -- Florida -- 19
House -- Florida -- 21
House -- Florida -- 24
House -- Florida -- 25
House -- Georgia -- 05
House -- Georgia -- 10
House -- Georgia -- 12
House -- Idaho -- 01
House -- Illinois -- 01
House -- Illinois -- 03
House -- Illinois -- 05
House -- Illinois -- 06
House -- Illinois -- 10
House -- Illinois -- 11
House -- Illinois -- 14
House -- Illinois -- 18
House -- Indiana -- 03
House -- Indiana -- 07
House -- Indiana -- 09
House -- Iowa -- 03
House -- Iowa -- 04
House -- Kansas -- 02
House -- Kentucky -- 02
House -- Kentucky -- 03
House -- Louisiana -- 01
House -- Louisiana -- 02
House -- Louisiana -- 04
House -- Louisiana -- 06
House -- Maine -- 01
House -- Maryland -- 01
House -- Maryland -- 04
House -- Massachusetts -- 05
House -- Michigan -- 01
House -- Michigan -- 07
House -- Michigan -- 09
House -- Michigan -- 13
House -- Minnesota -- 01
House -- Minnesota -- 03
House -- Minnesota -- 06
House -- Mississippi -- 01
House -- Mississippi -- 03
House -- Missouri -- 09
House -- Nevada -- 02
House -- Nevada -- 03
House -- New Hampshire -- 01
House -- New Hampshire -- 02
House -- New Jersey -- 03
House -- New Jersey -- 05
House -- New Jersey -- 07
House -- New Mexico -- 01
House -- New Mexico -- 02
House -- New York -- 13
House -- New York -- 15
House -- New York -- 20
House -- New York -- 21
House -- New York -- 23
House -- New York -- 24
House -- New York -- 25
House -- New York -- 26
House -- New York -- 29
House -- North Carolina -- 03
House -- North Carolina -- 08
House -- North Carolina -- 10
House -- North Dakota
House -- Ohio -- 01
House -- Ohio -- 02
House -- Ohio -- 05
House -- Ohio -- 07
House -- Ohio -- 10
House -- Ohio -- 15
House -- Ohio -- 16
House -- Oklahoma -- 05
House -- Oregon -- 05
House -- Pennsylvania -- 03
House -- Pennsylvania -- 04
House -- Pennsylvania -- 06
House -- Pennsylvania -- 10
House -- Pennsylvania -- 11
House -- Pennsylvania -- 12
House -- Pennsylvania -- 15
House -- South Carolina -- 01
House -- South Carolina -- 02
House -- South Carolina -- 05
House -- South Dakota
House -- Tennessee -- 07
House -- Tennessee -- 08
House -- Tennessee -- 09
House -- Texas -- 07
House -- Texas -- 10
House -- Texas -- 14
House -- Texas -- 22
House -- Utah -- 03
House -- Virginia -- 01
House -- Virginia -- 05
House -- Virginia -- 09
House -- Virginia -- 11
House -- Washington -- 08
House -- West Virginia -- 02
House -- Wisconsin -- 08
House -- Wyoming
Inauguration 2009
International
Issues
Judiciary
Local Elections
Media
Miscellaneous
Morning Thoughts
Politics Weekly
Polls
Rankings
Republicans
Senate
Senate -- Alaska
Senate -- Arizona
Senate -- Arkansas
Senate -- California
Senate -- Colorado
Senate -- Connecticut
Senate -- Delaware
Senate -- Florida
Senate -- Georgia
Senate -- Idaho
Senate -- Illinois
Senate -- Indiana
Senate -- Iowa
Senate -- Kansas
Senate -- Kentucky
Senate -- Louisiana
Senate -- Maine
Senate -- Massachusetts
Senate -- Minnesota
Senate -- Mississippi
Senate -- Missouri
Senate -- Montana
Senate -- Nebraska
Senate -- Nevada
Senate -- New Hampshire
Senate -- New Jersey
Senate -- New Mexico
Senate -- New York
Senate -- North Carolina
Senate -- North Dakota
Senate -- Ohio
Senate -- Oklahoma
Senate -- Oregon
Senate -- Pennsylvania
Senate -- South Carolina
Senate -- South Dakota
Senate -- Tennessee
Senate -- Texas
Senate -- Utah
Senate -- Virginia
Senate -- Wisconsin
Senate -- Wyoming
Sports
Supreme Court
WH 08
WH 08 -- Democrats
WH 08 -- Republicans
WH 12
WH 12 -- Republicans
White House

 

« FL Re-Do Better For GOP | Blog Home Page | Dems Target Capito In WV »

Morning Thoughts: The Perfect Storm

Good Thursday morning. Former Ohio Senator Howard Metzenbaum has died at the age of 90 at his home in Florida, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported. Metzenbaum, a Democrat, was appointed to a Senate seat in 1974 before losing and returning two years later, in 1976. He served until 1994. Here's what a saddened Washington is watching today:

-- The House will likely vote today on new eavesdropping legislation, an issue on which Republicans have repeatedly slammed their Democratic rivals for failure to act. The lower chamber also hopes to get through the budget resolution today. The Senate, meanwhile, will take up amendments to their own budget resolution and will hold a number of roll call votes. Meanwhile, a House Appropriations subcommittee holds a hearing with Census Bureau chief Steve Murdock, who, with two years to go until redistricting, is probably starting to feel the pressure.

-- The Democratic presidential contest, in the absence of any actual votes being cast, seems to teeter dangerously close to the brink of all-out war between two rival factions of the Democratic Party base. Former party veep nominee Geraldine Ferraro, the first woman to join a national major party ticket, resigned her post as a top Hillary Clinton fundraiser after a few days of building anger over statements she made about Barack Obama, CNN reports. Now, new video has surfaced of Obama's Chicago pastor using his own racially-charged language in terms of the nominating contest. Both candidates are being driven terribly off-message, and down a path neither want to take.

-- Is Ferraro a racist? Is Jeremiah Wright a racist? No. But the passion each feels for her and his favored candidate pits older white women against African Americans. If the contest goes to the August convention and produced a bloodied nominee, that nominee could have to face John McCain with only 90% of the party's traditional base. Clinton and Obama themselves don't want the conversation to approach race with a ten-foot pole, and both are trying to control their surrogates. It is the media, home of blogs, 24-hour news channels and an insatiable reporting corps, that is driving the Democratic bus toward the cliff, and if Obama and Clinton don't figure something out, they'll be the ones going head-first toward the bottom.

-- Floridians and Michiganders aren't helping. Sunshine State Democrats have laid out a plan for a June 3 revote, Politico's Amie Parnes reports, and while Michigan is struggling, that party is putting together its own plan. With about a dozen contests, including those two, left to be conducted, there is an increasingly small window through which both candidates can squeeze. The primaries still have obstacles to overcome: Florida members of Congress came out against a re-vote, and others suggest the situation will not be solved as easily, or as cheaply, as the two state parties would like. One group solidly in favor of the plan: Mailing house Pitney Bowes, as the Wall Street Journal reports.

-- Meanwhile, Michigan is planning a state-run, party-funded primary, the Detroit Free Press writes today. Such a contest would cost $10 million, though Pennsylvania Governor Rendell and New Jersey Governor Corzine are looking forward to raising that money. If the money shows up, the Michigan legislature would have to vote to allow the state to accept private money for a new primary. Obama campaign representatives have flat out rejected the mail-in concept in Michigan, but manager David Plouffe would not make such bold statements.

-- The scenarios under which each candidate can actually win: Clinton needs to virtually run the table, and by not small margins, in order to convince super delegates that she has the momentum to win. Once she starts attracting a big new flock of super delegates, the case for Obama leaving the race will start to build. Obama needs to win Pennsylvania, or run up a bigger delegate lead in remaining states, to deprive Clinton not only of a majority but of any sense of a close race or a comeback. Mixed results will only cause more pain for both candidates.

-- Consider the perfect storm that's brewing, though: The Democratic nominee could head into November without their full base, having been nominated by every state except Michigan and Florida and without having raised the money to compete in a general election. The Republican Party's national chances are low right now, thanks to President Bush's bad image. But given the chaos across the aisle, should John McCain actually be considered the favorite if any of those scenarios come to pass?

-- On the other hand, at least some members of the Democratic coalition are targeting John McCain to try and prevent a train wreck. The AFL-CIO kicked off what it said would be a $53.4 million campaign against the Arizona Senator, NYT's Michael Luo reported, that will include comprehensive voter mobilization programs and union members shadowing McCain at every stop. Labor has been less than effective in recent presidential primaries (as the split AFL-CIO and Change to Win factions battle each other, and as dueling endorsements attest), but they're still a force come November.

-- Rising Political Fortunes Of The Day: Tony Zinni, Wes Clark and half a dozen other retired generals and admirals have become common names on the Democratic side of the campaign trail this year. As each campaign argues over which candidate is better prepared to answer a phone call at 3 a.m. or to handle a national crisis, we wonder which candidate is more likely to hold a conference call with the newly retired Admiral William Fallon. President Bush, upset with Fallon's public disagreement with his strategy, wanted Fallon out, NBC's John Yang reports. Remember that, Fallon's name will be around for a while.

-- Today On The Trail: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell exert the power today, reminding all three presidential wanna-bes that they still have votes to cast. Clinton, Obama and McCain will each vote on the Senate budget amendments today, meaning cameramen will be angling for any shot with the three of them in it together. Later, Obama appears on Gwen Ifill's NewsHour.