Hispanics Score Under Trump

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Hispanics Score Under Trump
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It’s baseball season in America, and any fan knows that going 6 for 7 in batting is stellar. Well, President Trump just pulled off a 6 for 7 performance -- not in at-plate appearances but instead in an arena far more crucial: record jobs gains for Hispanic Americans.

Among Latinos, the jobless rate has only registered below 5 percent for seven months total – in the history of this country. Six of those months have occurred with Donald Trump in the White House, including the April report released last week.

The jobs data was terrific news for Americans of all ethnicities. For the first time since the year 2000, the overall unemployment rate dipped below 4 percent. Just as significant, almost 1 million Americans who had previously given up on finding a job have rejoined the workforce since Trump was elected.

This movement toward self-sufficiency is a notable achievement for all Americans, but particular focus should be placed on the gains for communities of color. Why? Because identity politics and Democrats’ Big Government policies have failed minorities. Only now, at long last, are those communities beginning to realize their potential, which has clearly been unleashed with help from the pro-growth Trump administration economic policies of deregulation, tax cuts, and border enforcement.

In contrast to the mainstream media narrative that the current president represents a retrenchment to a monolithic white America,  the results so far suggest that exactly the opposite is happening as both Hispanic and African-American jobless figures reach all-time lows. Small and start-up businesses – the normal engine of job creation – particularly thrive under the sensible regulatory restraint of this administration. In addition, recent surveys show soaring confidence among Americans about the humming U.S. economy.

This expansion among small business represents an especially crucial improvement for Hispanics, who are statistically  the most entrepreneurial demographic in America. Perhaps this start-up grit among my fellow Hispanics explains why Latinos massively outperformed polling and media expectations for Trump in the 2016 election despite widespread predictions of doom. In 2016, he bested the Hispanic vote earned by GOP nominee Mitt Romney in 2012, according to exit polling. Not bad for a candidate constantly derided by  clueless political elites as anti-Latino.

The recently passed tax cuts also represent a big win for Hispanic families who struggled under the previous administration. The harsh reality is that under President Obama, despite his popularity among voters of color, both blacks and Hispanics saw the gap widen between household wealth of white families and minorities families. The slow growth of the Obama years propelled massive asset appreciation, which exacerbated inequality because wages stagnated, much to the detriment of Hispanic prosperity. Thankfully, help is not just on the way, help is already here: The first quarter of 2018 saw wages – for all Americans – grow at the fastest clip in over a decade.

For communities of color, the new administration’s focus on immigration enforcement undoubtedly improves the prospects for American working-class citizens who no longer have to constantly compete in the wage markets against an unending flood of illegal workers. Perhaps for this reason, polling done by a liberal survey organization at the University of California shows that nearly 60 percent of respondents in deeply blue California believe that increasing deportations is very or somewhat important.  Nationally, Hispanic Americans believe by a 2-to-1 margin that immigration enforcement is too lax as opposed to too strict.

We Hispanic Americans, whether legal immigrant or native born, represent the newest chapter of the great American story. Our faith, family values, and work ethic are a treasure to America. With the policies of Donald J. Trump, Hispanics can at last share fully in the larger prosperity of this nation. I say, batter up!

Steve Cortes, a contributor to RealClearPolitics and a CNN  political commentator, is the national spokesman for the Hispanic 100, an organization that promotes Latino leadership by advancing free enterprise principles. His Twitter handle is @CortesSteve.



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