Advertisement

Rubio Finds Support on the Right for Immigration Plan

By Scott Conroy - January 22, 2013

‹‹Previous Page |1 | 2 |

But Republican consultant Bob Haus, who helped run Perry’s Iowa campaign, predicted that Rubio’s efforts on immigration reform would not sting him in a similar manner, if he does run in 2016.

“There are now more Republican leaders who are working to craft sensible, workable solutions than trying to simply derail everything,” Haus said. “These leaders are changing the debate. Republicans aren’t just against everything related to immigration. Now they’re for something. That signals a paradigm shift, and it will be a good one for the Republican Party.”

Despite those shifting sentiments on the right, however, there will no doubt be more than a few influential Republican voices in Iowa who remain resistant to Rubio’s proposals. Steve Deace, an influential conservative radio host in the nation’s first voting state, made clear on Twitter last week that he had no intention of getting behind Rubio’s plan.

“Strangely I am not reassured by Bill O'Reilly's endorsement of Marco Rubio's amnesty..err..immigration plan,” Deace tweeted.

During the 2012 primaries, Romney largely succeeded in his efforts to stake out a position to the right of his Republican opponents on the issue. But his short-term political gain became a Pyrrhic victory when the general election came around and the Obama campaign was able to paint him as an extremist on the issue.

Some former members of Romney’s team are among those taking that lesson to heart, seeing Rubio’s efforts as both politically savvy and a near necessity for the GOP’s future.

David Kochel, who helmed Romney’s near-victory in the 2012 Iowa caucuses, suggested that Rubio and other Republicans with their eye on the White House are wise to demonstrate a willingness to be a part of the solution to a difficult challenge.

“I think there will always be some folks in the conservative entertainment industry who will bang away at Republicans who want to work on immigration,” Kochel said. “But it's a real problem, and not just a party problem. Time to look it in the eye and solve it. We can do it without compromising our principles.” 

‹‹Previous Page |1 | 2 |

Scott Conroy is a national political reporter for RealClearPolitics. He can be reached at sconroy@realclearpolitics.com. Follow him on Twitter @RealClearScott.

Why We Can't (Or Won't) Govern
Robert Samuelson · November 17, 2014
Wanting Desperately to Matter
Erick Erickson · November 14, 2014
Our Gathering Storm
Michael Gerson · November 14, 2014

Scott Conroy

Author Archive

Follow Real Clear Politics

Latest On Twitter