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What We Don't Know About History Can Hurt Us

What We Don't Know About History Can Hurt Us

By John Stossel - July 27, 2011

"It ain't so much the things we don't know that get us into trouble. It's the things we know that just ain't so."

That famous line, attributed to many authors but apparently said by humorist Henry Wheeler Shaw (aka Josh Billings), applies to history as much as anything.

What liberates oppressed people? I was taught it's often American power. Just the threat of our military buildup defeated the Soviet Union, and our troops in the Middle East will create islands of freedom.

Unlikely, says historian Thaddeus Russell, author of "A Renegade History of the United States."

"As a matter of fact," Russell told me, "in general American military intervention has increased anti-Americanism and hardened repressive regimes. On the other hand, American popular culture -- what was often called the worst of our culture in many cases -- has actually done more for liberation and our national security than anything that the 82nd Airborne could do."

I told him that I thought that the Soviet Union collapsed because the Soviets spent so much trying to keep pace with Ronald Reagan's military buildup

On the contrary, Russell said, "it collapsed from within. ... People simply walked away from the ideology of communism. And that began especially when American popular culture -- jazz and rock and roll -- began infiltrating those countries after World War II."

I demanded evidence.

"American soldiers brought jazz during World War II to the eastern front. Soviet soldiers brought it back. Eastern European soldiers brought it and spread it across those countries. ... Stalin was hysterical about this."

The authorities were particularly concerned about young people performing and enjoying sensual music.

"Any regime at all depends on social order to maintain its power. Social order and sensuality, pleasures of the body, are often at odds. Stalin and his commissars understood that."

American authorities 30 years earlier also feared the sensuality of black music, said Russell, attacking it "as primitive jungle music that was bringing down American youth. Stalin and his commissars across Eastern Europe said exactly the same things with the same words later."

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John Stossel is the host of “Stossel”, which airs Thursdays on FOX Business Network at 9 pm ET. He’s the author of “No, They Can’t! Why Government Fails but Individuals Succeed”. More info here

Copyright 2011, Creators Syndicate Inc.

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