Advertisement

Guests: Senators Dianne Feinstein and John Thune

By Fox News Sunday, Fox News Sunday - May 13, 2012

On Air Now

You're logged in as Account

Special Guests: Sen. Dianne Feinstein, Sen. John Thune

This is a rush transcript from "Fox News Sunday," May 13, 2012. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

SHANNON BREAM, GUEST HOST: I'm Shannon Bream, in for Chris Wallace.

More questions than answers remained after a terrorist attack against the U.S. was foiled.

Are leaks about the covert operation hurting national security? Are airport screeners doing enough to protect passengers? We'll ask Senator Dianne Feinstein, chairman on the Select Committee on Intelligence.

Then, the 2012 campaign is in full swing. We'll talk politics with Republican Senator John Thune who some believe is a top contender in the veep stakes.

Senators Feinstein and Thune only on "Fox News Sunday."

Also, the president changes his mind on gay marriage and now, it's a campaign issue. We'll ask our Sunday panel how it will play out in November with voters.

All right now on "Fox News Sunday."

(MUSIC)

BREAM: Hello again. And happy Mother's Day from Fox News in Washington.

This week, the U.S., in a joint covert operation with Saudi Arabia, managed to block potential terrorist attack.

Here now to go over what we learn and to discuss a couple of important domestic issues as well is the chairman of the Select Committee on Intelligence, Senator Dianne Feinstein.

Senator, welcome back to "Fox News Sunday."

SEN. DIANNE FEINSTEIN, D-CALIF.: Hi, Shannon.

BREAM: Let's start with some of the latest information out of Yemen, where al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula is basically headquartered. Word of two drone attacks that took out militants.

What is your sense after the bomb plot information, these drone strikes, of what the situation is with al Qaeda in that region?

FEINSTEIN: I think the sense is, I know the sense is, that AQAP, as it's called, is the number one threat to your country. And therefore, there are prodigious efforts to get at the bomb maker of this nonmetallic bomb which may well be able to go through magnetometers and the fact that the bomb was recovered and recovered intact I think is a substantial victory. I think it's an impressive win for the CIA.

But it means that we have to devote all our resources right now to try to end this, because it can become very, very complicated.

BREAM: And information that leaked out this week when the story broke on Monday, there are have been concerns on both sides of the aisle about this. Your counterpart in the House, Mike Rogers, has said -- he was upset that it could have disrupted the opportunities and other ongoing operation. He said it could have been be a crime this information that leaked.

Here's what Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said about it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

LEON PANETTA, SECRETARY OF DEFENSE: You have to protect these people and you have to protect the confidence and the classification and the covert nature of this kind of work. When these leaks take place, I can't tell you how much they damage our ability to be able to pursue out intelligence efforts.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BREAM: What kind of investigation, if any, do you think should be launched in to how the information was released?

FEINSTEIN: A big one. This leak was serious. This leak essentially -- well, first of all, the operation was closely held. It was CIA, FBI, Homeland Security and TSA. So a limited number of people knew about it. General procedure would have the chairman and the vice chairman of each of the intelligence committees briefed during the attack or prior to it.

This was not the case. There was no briefing. Apparently, the leak came to an "A.P." reporter, the government called and asked that the story be held and the story was held until Monday and then was released. What this does, it certainly jeopardizes the asset. It certainly jeopardizes our ability to relate to other countries and for other countries to help us, and it gives a tip off to AQAP to be more careful about who they use as their couriers, as their bombers.

So, the leak did endanger sources and methods, and the leak I think has to be prosecuted.

So, the investigation is being done, hopefully concluded and criminal charges will go to the Department of Justice.

BREAM: Right. You touched on something about whether or not this bomb would have been detected. You mentioned that TSA was involved, part of this investigation.

Let's talk about -- there's been a lot of debate this week about whether our current screening technology would have picked this up.

Here's what Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said, "All things considered, yes, in high likelihood it would have been detected."

But you were brief, you said this. "This would have been an undetectable bomb coming in on an American airliner in the U.S."

So, based on what you know, are you confident in our screening technology? FEINSTEIN: For this particular material, candidly no. I can't say that I am. I think the pat-down probably is better than the magnetometer. I think Americans have to understand that this particular kind of explosive, nonmetallic, is not easily detectable and that's one of the reasons why Abdulmutallab wore it in his underway, so that he couldn't patted down sufficiently to detect it.

That's a problem and that's something the TSA has to grapple with. And the American public has not been terribly sympathetic. Although most people are, most travelers say, "I'm going to go with the flow, I recognize the need, therefore, I really don't mind being patted down." I'm in that category, but not everybody is.

So I came from Afghanistan last week along with my colleagues on the intelligence committee through Dubai and there screening was very heavy. Three -- you pass through magnetometers three times, very heavy pat-downs, they opened hand luggage at the gate, they look for gun powder or other things on your hands.

So there was a big pat down with additional security people present. It was very evident.

Having said that, you can't maintain that all of the time. So, I think it's very important that TSA keeps up its efforts and that we Americans who travel a lot understand what's at stake.

And, you know, when you see the number of people on these large planes, you are aware of the fact that this is really necessary to do and particularly right now. I am hopeful that we will be able to candidly kill this bomb maker and kill some of his other associates, because there is a dangerous process in play at the present time.

BREAM: You mentioned that you just returned from Afghanistan and I want to talk about news out of there as well, that a key former Taliban minister who's been sort of ongoing peace process and negotiations there was gunned down. The Taliban said it's not responsible.

But having been there, when you returned, you did express concerns of the Taliban and the fact that we are transitioning out. What's your take on the state of affairs in Afghanistan?  Print  Email  Share    Recommend Tweet

continued...

< 1 2 3 4 5> adsonar_placementId=1493988; adsonar_pid=1373767; adsonar_ps=-1; adsonar_zw=612; adsonar_zh=240; adsonar_jv='ads.adsonar.com'; FNS Transcripts

May 13, 2012

Sen. Dianne Feinstein talks national security; Sen. John Thune on Romney veepstakes

May 06, 2012

Marco Rubio makes the case for Mitt Romney, steers clear of vice presidential talk

April 29, 2012

John Brennan talks War on Terror; Joel and Victoria Osteen's message of hope

April 22, 2012

Sen. Joe Lieberman on Secret Service scandal; Gov. Mitch Daniels talks race for the White House ADVERTISEMENT Follow Fox News Sunday

Follow us on Twitter to get exclusive updates and announcements from the show!

 @FoxNewsSunday

Fox News Sunday is on Facebook! Coming Up on FNS: May 13, 2012

The US & Saudi governments successfully coordinate a covert operation against a terrorist plot originating in Yemen.  Plus, President Obama’s decision to endorse same-sex marriage.  We'll discuss both topics with the Senate's Republican Conference Chair John Thune & Senate Intelligence Chairman Dianne Feinstein.

ADVERTISEMENT Wallace Watch

April 29, 2012

WH Counterterrorism Adviser on Possible Terrorist Strike

President Obama's top counterterrorism adviser John Brennan joined "Fox News Sunday" to discuss a recent alert ...

FNS Panel Plus: April 29, 2012This week on Fox News Sunday: (4/29/12)Morning Booking Call Connect With FNS FacebookTwitterEmailFree PodcastBlogHulu On This Day

April 22, 2012

On This Day: April 22, 1993

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was dedicated in Washington, DC.

FNS Poll Take Our Poll(survey software) Shows America Live Fox & Friends Weekend Happening Now Studio B America News HQ Fox News Watch Huckabee The Cost of Freedom America's Newsroom Fox Report Justice with Judge Jeanine The Five Cavuto Geraldo at Large Red Eye w/ Gutfeld The Journal Editorial Report Fox News Sunday Greta Special Report The O' Reilly Factor Fox & Friends Hannity Specials War Stories Networks Fox News Fox Business Search

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2012 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes. Privacy - Terms

Connect with Fox News Sunday

Follow foxnewssunday

try { window.foxshows.footerbar.init("socialbar-shows-gnr","foxnewssunday"); } catch(err) { } try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-3128154-2"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".foxnews.com"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} $.ad.pre(); setPageVideo(); // video //= 0) {query += 'url' + i + '=' + encodeURIComponent(links[i].href) + '&';}}document.write('');})();//]]> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-3128154-2']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageLoadTime']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();

Are leaks about the covert operation hurting national security? Are airport screeners doing enough to protect passengers? We'll ask Senator Dianne Feinstein, chairman on the Select Committee on Intelligence.

Then, the 2012 campaign is in full swing. We'll talk politics with Republican Senator John Thune who some believe is a top contender in the veep stakes.

Senators Feinstein and Thune only on "Fox News Sunday."

Also, the president changes his mind on gay marriage and now, it's a campaign issue. We'll ask our Sunday panel how it will play out in November with voters.

All right now on "Fox News Sunday."

(MUSIC)

BREAM: Hello again. And happy Mother's Day from Fox News in Washington.

This week, the U.S., in a joint covert operation with Saudi Arabia, managed to block potential terrorist attack.

Here now to go over what we learn and to discuss a couple of important domestic issues as well is the chairman of the Select Committee on Intelligence, Senator Dianne Feinstein.

Senator, welcome back to "Fox News Sunday."

SEN. DIANNE FEINSTEIN, D-CALIF.: Hi, Shannon.

BREAM: Let's start with some of the latest information out of Yemen, where al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula is basically headquartered. Word of two drone attacks that took out militants.

What is your sense after the bomb plot information, these drone strikes, of what the situation is with al Qaeda in that region?

FEINSTEIN: I think the sense is, I know the sense is, that AQAP, as it's called, is the number one threat to your country. And therefore, there are prodigious efforts to get at the bomb maker of this nonmetallic bomb which may well be able to go through magnetometers and the fact that the bomb was recovered and recovered intact I think is a substantial victory. I think it's an impressive win for the CIA.

But it means that we have to devote all our resources right now to try to end this, because it can become very, very complicated.

BREAM: And information that leaked out this week when the story broke on Monday, there are have been concerns on both sides of the aisle about this. Your counterpart in the House, Mike Rogers, has said -- he was upset that it could have disrupted the opportunities and other ongoing operation. He said it could have been be a crime this information that leaked.

Here's what Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said about it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

LEON PANETTA, SECRETARY OF DEFENSE: You have to protect these people and you have to protect the confidence and the classification and the covert nature of this kind of work. When these leaks take place, I can't tell you how much they damage our ability to be able to pursue out intelligence efforts.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BREAM: What kind of investigation, if any, do you think should be launched in to how the information was released?

FEINSTEIN: A big one. This leak was serious. This leak essentially -- well, first of all, the operation was closely held. It was CIA, FBI, Homeland Security and TSA. So a limited number of people knew about it. General procedure would have the chairman and the vice chairman of each of the intelligence committees briefed during the attack or prior to it.

This was not the case. There was no briefing. Apparently, the leak came to an "A.P." reporter, the government called and asked that the story be held and the story was held until Monday and then was released. What this does, it certainly jeopardizes the asset. It certainly jeopardizes our ability to relate to other countries and for other countries to help us, and it gives a tip off to AQAP to be more careful about who they use as their couriers, as their bombers.

Read Full Article »

Latest On Twitter

Follow Real Clear Politics

Real Clear Politics Video

More RCP Video Highlights »