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Guests: Rick Santorum, Sens. Blumenthal & Graham

By Fox News Sunday, Fox News Sunday - March 4, 2012

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Special Guests: Rick Santorum, Sen. Lindsey Graham, Sen. Richard Blumenthal

The following is a rush transcript of the March 4, 2012 edition of "Fox News Sunday With Chris Wallace." This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

CHRIS WALLACE, HOST: I'm Chris Wallace.

There are 10 states and more than 400 delegates in play. It's the countdown to Super Tuesday.

With primaries and caucuses across the country, we'll ask presidential candidate Rick Santorum where he needs to win to regain momentum in the race. Rick Santorum -- a "Fox News Sunday" exclusive.

Then, President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu get ready to discus what to do about Iran. We'll explore how to keep that rogue nation from going nuclear with two key senators, Republican Lindsey Graham and Democrat Richard Blumenthal.

Also, U.S. soldiers are targeted in Afghanistan and the Syrian government attacks its own citizens. We'll ask our Sunday panel how the president should handle both hot spots.

And our power player of the week gets ready for March Madness.

All right now on "Fox News Sunday."

(MUSIC)

And hello again from Fox News in Washington. While all eyes are on Super Tuesday, Washington state held its caucuses Saturday and here are the results: Mitt Romney won with 38 percent, Ron Paul finished second with 25 percent, Rick Santorum was chose behind at 24, Newt Gingrich was last.

On Tuesday, 10 states are up with more delegates at take than all contests combined up until now.

Joining us from Tennessee, one of the states that votes on Super Tuesday, is former Senator Rick Santorum.

And, Senator, welcome back to "Fox News Sunday."

RICK SANTORUM, REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Thanks. Thank you, Chris. Good to be with you.

WALLACE: Good to be with you, sir.

Ohio is I think it's generally agreed the biggest prize on Super Tuesday, and it would seem to be tailor-made for you -- blue collar, manufacturing, lots of rural areas, big evangelical vote. Don't you have to win there, sir?

SANTORUM: Well, we are going to do very, very well there, I believe that. I mean, it's a tough state for us only because of the fact that -- with the money disadvantage, but we've got a great grassroots campaign. We are hanging in there and we feel very confident that we're going to do well.

As you know, it's always harder when you got two conservative candidates running in the race as we have seen in Washington and we've seen in some of the other states. We have the anti-Romney vote, if you will. Both Gingrich and I are slugging away.

We just need to show that we are the best candidate to go head-to-head. And if you look at all of the races, it's Governor Romney and me, one or two, or in this case in Washington, Congressman Paul spent a lot of time out there. But we are the ones that are the alternative, the real clear alternative. And, you know, eventually hopefully the race will settle out and we'll go one on one. And once that happens, we feel very comfortable we're going to win this thing.

WALLACE: Well, you raise the question -- should Newt Gingrich drop out?

SANTORUM: Well, that's up for him to decide. But, clearly, if you continue to combine the votes that Congressman Gingrich and I get, you know, we are pretty doing well. In Michigan, we would have won easily had those two votes been combined.

You know, that's a process. I think Newt has got to figure out, you know, where he goes after Georgia and we're going to see that I think we're going to do well here in Tennessee. We're going to do well in Oklahoma. I think we can do very well also in Ohio and North Dakota, I think we will come in second place in a lot of places, too.

So, again, if you look at, you know, where you can finish first and good second places, again, this race narrows to two candidates over time and that's where we have our opportunity.

WALLACE: On the other hand, because of filing problems, you may be ineligible for 18 of the Ohio's 66 delegates and you're not even on the ballot in Virginia, which means you have to chance for those 49 delegates. The Romney campaign says this is a question of basic competence and they say you flunked.

SANTORUM: Well, as you know, Chris, those delegates had to be filed in Virginia and all the way back in early part of December. And, you know, look, I'll be honest, I mean, I was running across the state of Iowa and, you know, sitting in 2 percent of the national polls, with very, very limited resources, you know, we didn't have the ability to go out.

I think it is remarkable that if you look at all of the states other than the handful in Ohio and in Virginia, where we weren't the only that didn't get on the ballot. Rick Perry didn't get on, with a lot of resources, and Newt Gingrich who had a lot of resources didn't get back on.

You know, we've done amazingly well for a campaign early on that didn't have a lot of resources to go out and do things. We got on a lot of ballots that people just thought we wouldn't.

And I feel very good that we got on enough, clearly enough to be able to win this nomination.

WALLACE: Rush Limbaugh has now apologized to the Georgetown law student who said that her student health plan should cover birth control. But your party is still pushing this issue. In the Senate, they offered a Blunt amendment this week which said that any business, any insurance company could decide on moral grounds not to offer birth control coverage as part of the health insurance plan.

Do you really want to be campaigning on contraception in the year 2012?

SANTORUM: Well, the Blunt amendment was broader than that as you know. I mean, it was a conscience clause exception. I mean, it's a conscience clause exception that existed prior to when President Obama decided that he could impose his values on people of faith when the people of faith believed that this is a grievous moral wrong.

WALLACE: But, respectfully, sire -- let me just say. But the Blunt amendment wasn't just talking about Catholic institutions, Catholic colleges, charities.

SANTORUM: Right.

WALLACE: It was saying any, you know, U.S. deal, any company, any insurance company could decide not to offer birth control.

SANTORUM: If there -- no, no, it wasn't about birth control. It was about a moral exception to any type of mandate. It didn't specify birth control.

WALLACE: No, but including birth control. Right, any treatment.

SANTORUM: Well, yes, this is a conscience clause exception, which used to be something that was unanimously agreed to. Daniel Patrick Moynihan back in the Hillarycare bill offered a similar bill and it was widely -- it was accepted widely.

The idea that the government can force people to do things that they believe are morally wrong is something that heretofore was seen as an outrage that the government, there would be a separation of church and state. You hear so much about the left say, oh, we need to separate church and state. Well, how about the separation of church and state when the state wants to force the church and people who are believers into doing something that they don't want to do?

And as you know, in that amendment, it said that if people want to object to certain treatments, that the secretary of health could require them to adopt other treatments. So, it's actually the same. So, it's not something where people can say, well, we're just going to get out of paying for these things because we don't want to for them. It's -- well, there's real, clear conscious protection for the people of faith, the government should not be forcing people to do things that are against their conscience. That is a hallmark of America and absolutely anchored in the First Amendment.

WALLACE: But, Senator, it is more than a issue of faith and conscience and religious freedom. You say that you believe that birth control is wrong. Take a look.  Print  Email  Share    Recommend Tweet

continued...

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March 04, 2012

Rick Santorum looks ahead to Super Tuesday; Sens. Graham, Blumenthal talk Iran, Afghanistan

February 26, 2012

Mitt Romney on defending home turf; Gov. Mitch Daniels talks presidential politics

February 19, 2012

Newt Gingrich on resurrecting his presidential campaign; Eric Cantor talks payroll tax holiday

February 12, 2012

Jack Lew defends compromise on birth control mandate; Sarah Palin rates GOP field ADVERTISEMENT Follow Fox News Sunday

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Mitt Romney wins two key primaries, but Rick Santorum manages to keep it close in Michigan.  So can the former Senator mount a comeback by scoring some major wins in next week’s Super Tuesday contests?  We’ll speak Exclusively with Presidential Candidate Rick Santorum.Then, turmoil in Afghanistan continues, as do fears over Iran’s nuclear program.  We’ll talk foreign policy with two key members of the Armed Services Committee, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) & Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT).

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FNS Panel Plus: March 4, 2012

Watch the 'FOX News Sunday' panel, Bill Kristol, Jeff Zeleny, Kimberley Strassel and Juan Williams, as they discuss Super Tuesday, in our web exclusive Panel Plus.

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With primaries and caucuses across the country, we'll ask presidential candidate Rick Santorum where he needs to win to regain momentum in the race. Rick Santorum -- a "Fox News Sunday" exclusive.

Then, President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu get ready to discus what to do about Iran. We'll explore how to keep that rogue nation from going nuclear with two key senators, Republican Lindsey Graham and Democrat Richard Blumenthal.

Also, U.S. soldiers are targeted in Afghanistan and the Syrian government attacks its own citizens. We'll ask our Sunday panel how the president should handle both hot spots.

And our power player of the week gets ready for March Madness.

All right now on "Fox News Sunday."

(MUSIC)

And hello again from Fox News in Washington. While all eyes are on Super Tuesday, Washington state held its caucuses Saturday and here are the results: Mitt Romney won with 38 percent, Ron Paul finished second with 25 percent, Rick Santorum was chose behind at 24, Newt Gingrich was last.

On Tuesday, 10 states are up with more delegates at take than all contests combined up until now.

Joining us from Tennessee, one of the states that votes on Super Tuesday, is former Senator Rick Santorum.

And, Senator, welcome back to "Fox News Sunday."

RICK SANTORUM, REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Thanks. Thank you, Chris. Good to be with you.

WALLACE: Good to be with you, sir.

Ohio is I think it's generally agreed the biggest prize on Super Tuesday, and it would seem to be tailor-made for you -- blue collar, manufacturing, lots of rural areas, big evangelical vote. Don't you have to win there, sir?

SANTORUM: Well, we are going to do very, very well there, I believe that. I mean, it's a tough state for us only because of the fact that -- with the money disadvantage, but we've got a great grassroots campaign. We are hanging in there and we feel very confident that we're going to do well.

As you know, it's always harder when you got two conservative candidates running in the race as we have seen in Washington and we've seen in some of the other states. We have the anti-Romney vote, if you will. Both Gingrich and I are slugging away.

We just need to show that we are the best candidate to go head-to-head. And if you look at all of the races, it's Governor Romney and me, one or two, or in this case in Washington, Congressman Paul spent a lot of time out there. But we are the ones that are the alternative, the real clear alternative. And, you know, eventually hopefully the race will settle out and we'll go one on one. And once that happens, we feel very comfortable we're going to win this thing.

WALLACE: Well, you raise the question -- should Newt Gingrich drop out?

SANTORUM: Well, that's up for him to decide. But, clearly, if you continue to combine the votes that Congressman Gingrich and I get, you know, we are pretty doing well. In Michigan, we would have won easily had those two votes been combined.

You know, that's a process. I think Newt has got to figure out, you know, where he goes after Georgia and we're going to see that I think we're going to do well here in Tennessee. We're going to do well in Oklahoma. I think we can do very well also in Ohio and North Dakota, I think we will come in second place in a lot of places, too.

So, again, if you look at, you know, where you can finish first and good second places, again, this race narrows to two candidates over time and that's where we have our opportunity.

WALLACE: On the other hand, because of filing problems, you may be ineligible for 18 of the Ohio's 66 delegates and you're not even on the ballot in Virginia, which means you have to chance for those 49 delegates. The Romney campaign says this is a question of basic competence and they say you flunked.

SANTORUM: Well, as you know, Chris, those delegates had to be filed in Virginia and all the way back in early part of December. And, you know, look, I'll be honest, I mean, I was running across the state of Iowa and, you know, sitting in 2 percent of the national polls, with very, very limited resources, you know, we didn't have the ability to go out.

I think it is remarkable that if you look at all of the states other than the handful in Ohio and in Virginia, where we weren't the only that didn't get on the ballot. Rick Perry didn't get on, with a lot of resources, and Newt Gingrich who had a lot of resources didn't get back on.

You know, we've done amazingly well for a campaign early on that didn't have a lot of resources to go out and do things. We got on a lot of ballots that people just thought we wouldn't.

And I feel very good that we got on enough, clearly enough to be able to win this nomination.

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