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Roundtable on Sen. Sanders' Filibuster

By Special Report w/Bret Baier, Special Report w/Bret Baier - December 10, 2010

Friday, December 10, 2010

Special Guests | Steve Hayes, Nia-Malika Henderson, Charles Krauthammer

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This is a rush transcript from "Special Report," December 10, 2010. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)adsonar_placementId=1499756;adsonar_pid=150758;adsonar_ps=-1;adsonar_zw=336;adsonar_zh=170;adsonar_jv='ads.adsonar.com';

BILL CLINTON: In my opinion, this is a good bill, and I hope that my fellow Democrats will support it.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CHRIS WALLACE, HOST OF “FOX NEWS SUNDAY”: That was Bill Clinton during his impromptu half-hour news conference in the White House briefing room today. Time to bring in our panel, Steve Hayes, of the Weekly Standard, Nia-Malika Henderson from the Washington Post, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer. Charles, we'll get to your role in the press conference in a moment.

But first talk about the substance of what Bill Clinton said, Steve.  How convincing an argument did he make on behalf of this tax cut deal and how strong did his advice seem about how Barack Obama should handle his changed political circumstances?

STEVE HAYES, SENIOR WRITER, THE WEEKLY STANDARD: I don't think he made a terribly politically convincing advice to his target audience, which was the House Democrats. I don't think he persuaded many of them on what to do on its merits. He called it a good deal.

He certainly didn't persuade somebody like me that it's a good deal. It's not a bad deal. It's a good deal or a deal that Republicans should probably take, because it does the things that Republicans need it to do.  But in terms of making it a positive argument that would sway Democrats who I think are the key here, I don't think he did it.

WALLACE: Well, let me follow up on that with you. On one hand, he also said this will stimulate the economy, and that's important. And he also basically said you're going to get a worse deal after Republicans take control of the House. Those seem to be two pretty good arguments.

NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON, WASHINGTON POST: He's essentially doubling down on argument that Barack Obama has been making, which is this is as good as it gets. Of course he doesn't agree with some of the tax cuts for the upper class, but, you know, this is as good as it gets.

Barack Obama has been very much going to the outside game. All over the last couple of days we've been getting e-mails about the mayor of Kokomo supporting this and governor of Ohio. He went to his biggest gun today, Bill Clinton making a really forceful pitch for this.

But the problem is with the House democrat. You had the CBC today, you know, these are among the Congressional Black Caucus, mop the loyal constituents and represent those folks who said it's still a bum deal.  We'll see what happens.

WALLACE: and how much stroke do you think Bill Clinton has with the liberal House Democrats?

HENDERSON: I think he probably has some sway. If you watch TV over the last couple of days, you know, MSNBC, the members of the kind of professional left, Rachel Maddow and Keith Olbermann have very much been going after the president. So you do feel like this was a way to quiet those voices and also maybe hold sway with some of the really left-leaning House Democrats.

WALLACE: Charles, it may have escaped your attention, but in the course of defending the president's deal, Clinton quoted a Washington wise-man. Let's watch.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BILL CLINTON: The really interesting thing was is that a lot of the hardcore conservatives think Republicans gave too much. Read Charles Krauthammer's column in The Post today, he's a brilliant man and he pointed out that they got divisive tax cuts, but most of them were targeted to middle class working people.

(END VIDEO CLIP)WALLACE: And he went on and on and on. How accurately did he represent what you said in your column?

 

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: Not extremely. However, the fact he praised me means my career is basically over, although perhaps I think NPR has an opening, the Juan Williams spot.

(LAUGHTER)

WALLACE: I was going to say don't say anything bad about riding on airplanes.

KRAUTHAMMER: Or I could return to psychiatry. The House Democrats could really use someone right now. They're really agitated. I would go in the caucus and a valium spray and get all of them at once.

Look, the House Democrats are not persuaded by the intellectual argument of the president on this issue. In fact, the fact that he hauls out my column support for his position explains what I oppose this deal.  It is a cave by the Republicans and something we ought not to agree to.

But I thought what bringing in an outsider like Clinton, the triangulator does, or a letter from the AFL-CIO, which the Obama administration also produced, is a way not to change the minds of the House Democrats but to give them cover.

The hard left is attacking the president and the deal and wanting to vote it down. If you are a House liberal and you think in the end it would be a catastrophe to the president, and if you look at it I think it is a good deal if you are a liberal, it would be unwise to vote it down. This will give you cover.

WALLACE: Let's talk, and we can't ignore it, just the sheer spectacle of today. Let me just set the timeline for people who weren't watching.  Barack Obama brings Bill Clinton in the press room. Clinton makes an opening statement, backing the tax deal, backing the START treaty.

Ten minutes. Obama says I got to leave. I've kept the first lady waiting. And Bill Clinton kept talking for another 20 minutes.

HAYES: Bill Clinton clearly loved being back in the spotlight. It was interesting to see him try to make this case on behalf of the president.

I think there’s another reason maybe Bill Clinton liked Charles' column so much this morning, and it's because Charles uncharacteristically used the language of the left to make his case. He's talking about -- I picked up the Washington Post this morning and read it -- blowing trillion-dollar hole in the budget, "budget-busting."

The reality of the plan is that three-quarters, more than three-quarters of it goes to allowing people to keep their own money. Less than a tenth of it goes to new spending.

WALLACE: OK, with all due respect of that argument. I want to talk about Bill Clinton. Nia, your thought about -- and the fact he stayed on the podium and owned the White House podium and Barack Obama just went on.

HENDERSON: Yes. I have to say in the Washington Post newsroom we got a call from someone who wanted to know who the president was. There was a deja vu going on. It was flashback to the '90s, and we guessed how long he'd be there, we guessed an hour. Bill Clinton likes to hold court and was clearly enjoying himself there.

It raises the issue how long will Obama be tied to Clinton. This raises the issue of how long he is going to need Clinton to make a pitch to the base.

WALLACE: We have less than a minute. Watching the two of them side- by-side, how do you compare Obama, his strengths, his weaknesses, and Clinton?

KRAUTHAMMER: My first impression is that the handler who arranged for that meeting and the joint appearance and Obama having to abscond in the middle, that handler is on his way to gulag somewhere way out there, way out there somewhere.

WALLACE: Anchorage?

KRAUTHAMMER: Well, no. I think in the arctic zones of Russia, probably. You don't put anybody on a podium with Bill Clinton. It's like actors say they never want to costar with a child or a dog. Clinton’s the master, and Obama was looking rather like leftover. He's the president of the United States, but there was no way he could seize the podium back.  You have the old pro and the rookie, and the rookie looks like a rookie when he’s in the presence of the old pro.

WALLACE: Congratulations on the shout out. It was very nice.

continued...

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December 10, 2010

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A Virginia judge declares a key part of the President's health care law unconstitutional.

Exclusive Interview With President Obama

• Part 1: Obama on health care

• Part 2: Obama on foreign policy

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Every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. ET After the Show

Join our live-streaming webcast and chat, for the reactions you didn’t hear from the panel, and a chance for you to weigh in with your thoughts and questions LIVE.

Connect with Special Report MyspaceFacebookTwitterEmailAudio PodcastPanel Podcast All-Star Panelists -- Monday, December 13 Charles Krauthammer

Krauthammer writes a syndicated column for The Washington Post. He is also a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington.

Stephen Hayes

Stephen Hayes is a senior writer at The Weekly Standard in Washington, DC, and author of two New York Times bestsellers. He writes frequently on electoral politics and national security.

Juan Williams

Juan Williams joined FOX News in 1997 as a political contributor. He is a regular panelist on FOX Broadcasting's Sunday morning public affairs program, "FOX News Sunday."

Read his bio

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This is a rush transcript from "Special Report," December 10, 2010. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BILL CLINTON: In my opinion, this is a good bill, and I hope that my fellow Democrats will support it.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CHRIS WALLACE, HOST OF “FOX NEWS SUNDAY”: That was Bill Clinton during his impromptu half-hour news conference in the White House briefing room today. Time to bring in our panel, Steve Hayes, of the Weekly Standard, Nia-Malika Henderson from the Washington Post, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer. Charles, we'll get to your role in the press conference in a moment.

But first talk about the substance of what Bill Clinton said, Steve.  How convincing an argument did he make on behalf of this tax cut deal and how strong did his advice seem about how Barack Obama should handle his changed political circumstances?

STEVE HAYES, SENIOR WRITER, THE WEEKLY STANDARD: I don't think he made a terribly politically convincing advice to his target audience, which was the House Democrats. I don't think he persuaded many of them on what to do on its merits. He called it a good deal.

He certainly didn't persuade somebody like me that it's a good deal. It's not a bad deal. It's a good deal or a deal that Republicans should probably take, because it does the things that Republicans need it to do.  But in terms of making it a positive argument that would sway Democrats who I think are the key here, I don't think he did it.

WALLACE: Well, let me follow up on that with you. On one hand, he also said this will stimulate the economy, and that's important. And he also basically said you're going to get a worse deal after Republicans take control of the House. Those seem to be two pretty good arguments.

NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON, WASHINGTON POST: He's essentially doubling down on argument that Barack Obama has been making, which is this is as good as it gets. Of course he doesn't agree with some of the tax cuts for the upper class, but, you know, this is as good as it gets.

Barack Obama has been very much going to the outside game. All over the last couple of days we've been getting e-mails about the mayor of Kokomo supporting this and governor of Ohio. He went to his biggest gun today, Bill Clinton making a really forceful pitch for this.

But the problem is with the House democrat. You had the CBC today, you know, these are among the Congressional Black Caucus, mop the loyal constituents and represent those folks who said it's still a bum deal.  We'll see what happens.

WALLACE: and how much stroke do you think Bill Clinton has with the liberal House Democrats?

HENDERSON: I think he probably has some sway. If you watch TV over the last couple of days, you know, MSNBC, the members of the kind of professional left, Rachel Maddow and Keith Olbermann have very much been going after the president. So you do feel like this was a way to quiet those voices and also maybe hold sway with some of the really left-leaning House Democrats.

WALLACE: Charles, it may have escaped your attention, but in the course of defending the president's deal, Clinton quoted a Washington wise-man. Let's watch.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BILL CLINTON: The really interesting thing was is that a lot of the hardcore conservatives think Republicans gave too much. Read Charles Krauthammer's column in The Post today, he's a brilliant man and he pointed out that they got divisive tax cuts, but most of them were targeted to middle class working people.

(END VIDEO CLIP)WALLACE: And he went on and on and on. How accurately did he represent what you said in your column?

 

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: Not extremely. However, the fact he praised me means my career is basically over, although perhaps I think NPR has an opening, the Juan Williams spot.

(LAUGHTER)

WALLACE: I was going to say don't say anything bad about riding on airplanes.

KRAUTHAMMER: Or I could return to psychiatry. The House Democrats could really use someone right now. They're really agitated. I would go in the caucus and a valium spray and get all of them at once.

Look, the House Democrats are not persuaded by the intellectual argument of the president on this issue. In fact, the fact that he hauls out my column support for his position explains what I oppose this deal.  It is a cave by the Republicans and something we ought not to agree to.

But I thought what bringing in an outsider like Clinton, the triangulator does, or a letter from the AFL-CIO, which the Obama administration also produced, is a way not to change the minds of the House Democrats but to give them cover.

The hard left is attacking the president and the deal and wanting to vote it down. If you are a House liberal and you think in the end it would be a catastrophe to the president, and if you look at it I think it is a good deal if you are a liberal, it would be unwise to vote it down. This will give you cover.

WALLACE: Let's talk, and we can't ignore it, just the sheer spectacle of today. Let me just set the timeline for people who weren't watching.  Barack Obama brings Bill Clinton in the press room. Clinton makes an opening statement, backing the tax deal, backing the START treaty.

Ten minutes. Obama says I got to leave. I've kept the first lady waiting. And Bill Clinton kept talking for another 20 minutes.

HAYES: Bill Clinton clearly loved being back in the spotlight. It was interesting to see him try to make this case on behalf of the president.

I think there’s another reason maybe Bill Clinton liked Charles' column so much this morning, and it's because Charles uncharacteristically used the language of the left to make his case. He's talking about -- I picked up the Washington Post this morning and read it -- blowing trillion-dollar hole in the budget, "budget-busting."

The reality of the plan is that three-quarters, more than three-quarters of it goes to allowing people to keep their own money. Less than a tenth of it goes to new spending.

WALLACE: OK, with all due respect of that argument. I want to talk about Bill Clinton. Nia, your thought about -- and the fact he stayed on the podium and owned the White House podium and Barack Obama just went on.

HENDERSON: Yes. I have to say in the Washington Post newsroom we got a call from someone who wanted to know who the president was. There was a deja vu going on. It was flashback to the '90s, and we guessed how long he'd be there, we guessed an hour. Bill Clinton likes to hold court and was clearly enjoying himself there.

It raises the issue how long will Obama be tied to Clinton. This raises the issue of how long he is going to need Clinton to make a pitch to the base.

WALLACE: We have less than a minute. Watching the two of them side- by-side, how do you compare Obama, his strengths, his weaknesses, and Clinton?

KRAUTHAMMER: My first impression is that the handler who arranged for that meeting and the joint appearance and Obama having to abscond in the middle, that handler is on his way to gulag somewhere way out there, way out there somewhere.

WALLACE: Anchorage?

KRAUTHAMMER: Well, no. I think in the arctic zones of Russia, probably. You don't put anybody on a podium with Bill Clinton. It's like actors say they never want to costar with a child or a dog. Clinton’s the master, and Obama was looking rather like leftover. He's the president of the United States, but there was no way he could seize the podium back.  You have the old pro and the rookie, and the rookie looks like a rookie when he’s in the presence of the old pro.

WALLACE: Congratulations on the shout out. It was very nice.

continued...

< 1 2> adsonar_placementId=1499753;adsonar_pid=150758;adsonar_ps=-1;adsonar_zw=612;adsonar_zh=140;adsonar_jv='ads.adsonar.com'; Show Transcripts

Choose a category

The Grapevine The GrapevineBrit Hume's CommentaryAll-Star Panelist Interviews

Latest Transcript

December 10, 2010

Please click on a date for previous transcripts:

Loading Datepicker Monday on Special Report

A Virginia judge declares a key part of the President's health care law unconstitutional.

Exclusive Interview With President Obama

• Part 1: Obama on health care

• Part 2: Obama on foreign policy

• Read the transcript

Special Report Online

Every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. ET After the Show

Join our live-streaming webcast and chat, for the reactions you didn’t hear from the panel, and a chance for you to weigh in with your thoughts and questions LIVE.

Connect with Special Report MyspaceFacebookTwitterEmailAudio PodcastPanel Podcast All-Star Panelists -- Monday, December 13 Charles Krauthammer

Krauthammer writes a syndicated column for The Washington Post. He is also a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington.

Stephen Hayes

Stephen Hayes is a senior writer at The Weekly Standard in Washington, DC, and author of two New York Times bestsellers. He writes frequently on electoral politics and national security.

Juan Williams

Juan Williams joined FOX News in 1997 as a political contributor. He is a regular panelist on FOX Broadcasting's Sunday morning public affairs program, "FOX News Sunday."

Read his bio

Home U.S. World Politics Health Business SciTech Entertainment Video Opinion Sports Leisure Topics Careers Internships - FNCU Fox Around the World RSS Feeds Advertise With Us Terms of Use Privacy Policy Contact Us Email Newsroom FAQ /**/ $.ad.pre(); setPageVideo(); // video

BILL CLINTON: In my opinion, this is a good bill, and I hope that my fellow Democrats will support it.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CHRIS WALLACE, HOST OF “FOX NEWS SUNDAY”: That was Bill Clinton during his impromptu half-hour news conference in the White House briefing room today. Time to bring in our panel, Steve Hayes, of the Weekly Standard, Nia-Malika Henderson from the Washington Post, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer. Charles, we'll get to your role in the press conference in a moment.

But first talk about the substance of what Bill Clinton said, Steve.  How convincing an argument did he make on behalf of this tax cut deal and how strong did his advice seem about how Barack Obama should handle his changed political circumstances?

STEVE HAYES, SENIOR WRITER, THE WEEKLY STANDARD: I don't think he made a terribly politically convincing advice to his target audience, which was the House Democrats. I don't think he persuaded many of them on what to do on its merits. He called it a good deal.

He certainly didn't persuade somebody like me that it's a good deal. It's not a bad deal. It's a good deal or a deal that Republicans should probably take, because it does the things that Republicans need it to do.  But in terms of making it a positive argument that would sway Democrats who I think are the key here, I don't think he did it.

WALLACE: Well, let me follow up on that with you. On one hand, he also said this will stimulate the economy, and that's important. And he also basically said you're going to get a worse deal after Republicans take control of the House. Those seem to be two pretty good arguments.

NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON, WASHINGTON POST: He's essentially doubling down on argument that Barack Obama has been making, which is this is as good as it gets. Of course he doesn't agree with some of the tax cuts for the upper class, but, you know, this is as good as it gets.

Barack Obama has been very much going to the outside game. All over the last couple of days we've been getting e-mails about the mayor of Kokomo supporting this and governor of Ohio. He went to his biggest gun today, Bill Clinton making a really forceful pitch for this.

But the problem is with the House democrat. You had the CBC today, you know, these are among the Congressional Black Caucus, mop the loyal constituents and represent those folks who said it's still a bum deal.  We'll see what happens.

WALLACE: and how much stroke do you think Bill Clinton has with the liberal House Democrats?

HENDERSON: I think he probably has some sway. If you watch TV over the last couple of days, you know, MSNBC, the members of the kind of professional left, Rachel Maddow and Keith Olbermann have very much been going after the president. So you do feel like this was a way to quiet those voices and also maybe hold sway with some of the really left-leaning House Democrats.

WALLACE: Charles, it may have escaped your attention, but in the course of defending the president's deal, Clinton quoted a Washington wise-man. Let's watch.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BILL CLINTON: The really interesting thing was is that a lot of the hardcore conservatives think Republicans gave too much. Read Charles Krauthammer's column in The Post today, he's a brilliant man and he pointed out that they got divisive tax cuts, but most of them were targeted to middle class working people.

(END VIDEO CLIP)WALLACE: And he went on and on and on. How accurately did he represent what you said in your column?

 

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: Not extremely. However, the fact he praised me means my career is basically over, although perhaps I think NPR has an opening, the Juan Williams spot.

(LAUGHTER)

WALLACE: I was going to say don't say anything bad about riding on airplanes.

KRAUTHAMMER: Or I could return to psychiatry. The House Democrats could really use someone right now. They're really agitated. I would go in the caucus and a valium spray and get all of them at once.

Look, the House Democrats are not persuaded by the intellectual argument of the president on this issue. In fact, the fact that he hauls out my column support for his position explains what I oppose this deal.  It is a cave by the Republicans and something we ought not to agree to.

But I thought what bringing in an outsider like Clinton, the triangulator does, or a letter from the AFL-CIO, which the Obama administration also produced, is a way not to change the minds of the House Democrats but to give them cover.

The hard left is attacking the president and the deal and wanting to vote it down. If you are a House liberal and you think in the end it would be a catastrophe to the president, and if you look at it I think it is a good deal if you are a liberal, it would be unwise to vote it down. This will give you cover.

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