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Roundtable on the Monthly Jobs Report

By Special Report w/Bret Baier, Special Report w/Bret Baier - August 6, 2010

Friday, August 06, 2010

Special Guests | Steve Hayes, Jennifer Loven, Charles Krauthammer

Watch the latest video at FoxNews.com

This is a rush transcript of "Special Report With Bret Baier" from August 4, 2010. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.adsonar_placementId=1499756;adsonar_pid=150758;adsonar_ps=-1;adsonar_zw=336;adsonar_zh=170;adsonar_jv='ads.adsonar.com';

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: July job numbers reflect in part expected losses related to the census winding down. But the fact is, we've now added private sector jobs every month this year instead of losing them as we did for the first seven months of last year.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CHRIS WALLACE, ANCHOR: President Obama putting the best face today on what are generally considered disappointing job numbers for July. And let's bring in our panel: Steven Hayes of The Weekly Standard; Jennifer Loven, chief White House correspondent for the Associated Press, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer.

So, let's take a look at the July numbers behind the 9.5 percent overall unemployment rate. Let's put them up on the screen: As you can see -- 143,000 census jobs that ended, temporary jobs and were ended as expected. Private employers added just 71,000 jobs. Overall, 131,000 jobs lost last month.

Steve, what is all of that tell you about the state of this recovery?

STEVE HAYES, WEEKLY STANDARD: Well, I think the first thing to be said is that we didn't fall off a cliff. Things did not get dramatically worse in this -- in these job numbers. But they're not good. I mean, the 71,000 number is interesting, but we'll see if it's 71,000 when we look at these numbers in a month.

Remember, we just had the June number, the private sector June number revised down to 31,000.

WALLACE: Eighty thousand to 30,000.

HAYES: That's pretty --that's a pretty big drop. So, we'll see if the 71,000 number is what it is.

But the president -- I mean, I give the guy credit for going out and continuing to try to make the argument. I suppose he doesn't have much of a choice at this point, but he's getting to the point where he's, you know, he's touting these things that are slivers of good news against this vast array of bad numbers and bad news day after day after day. And he's out touting batteries or signs, or, you know, pointing -- trying to point to anything that can give him a boost. I think it's very tough and it's getting tougher.

WALLACE: Yes. Jennifer, political experts generally say that voters make up their mind several months before the election of what the state of the economy is. We're now several months before the election. I mean, this is the decision time when people's opinions are firming up.

How worried are they when they continue to see these not very encouraging numbers and see just how tepid this recovery is?

JENNIFER LOVEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS: Well, I think you can tell how worried they are by what Steve rightly pointed to, a sort of a tortured explanation that you hear from the president, right? You have these numbers, he picks out a thin sliver of good news and, you know, couches it correctly in all the bad news. And it doesn't add up to very much, right?

And the White House realizes that they have before them is a very hard sell, which is it's not as bad as it could be. That's not the kind of slogan that wins elections and they realize that that's a really tough thing for him to go out and say.

What they're hoping is that he can continue to talk about what little bits of good news there is and talk about the things that could have happened that didn't and his ideas for trying to create more jobs. Some of which are being opposed by Republicans and that that will be --

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE: And the other argument they're making is, hey, it's not as bad as it was. In the old days, they drove us into a ditch, we're getting us out.

continued...

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The Grapevine The GrapevineBrit Hume's CommentaryAll-Star Panelist Interviews

Latest Transcript

August 06, 2010

Please click on a date for previous transcripts:

Loading Datepicker Monday on Special Report

Republicans are expected to offer a special resolution in hopes of assuring Democrats won't hold a lame duck session after the midterms.  We'll follow the back-and-forth.

Exclusive Interview With President Obama

• Part 1: Obama on health care

• Part 2: Obama on foreign policy

• Read the transcript

Special Report Poll Take Our Poll(polls) Special Report Online

Every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. ET After the Show

Join our live-streaming webcast and chat, for the reactions you didn’t hear from the panel, and a chance for you to weigh in with your thoughts and questions LIVE.

Connect with Special Report MyspaceFacebookTwitterEmailAudio PodcastPanel Podcast All-Star Panelists -- Monday, August 9 Charles Krauthammer

Krauthammer writes a syndicated column for The Washington Post. He is also a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington.

Stephen Hayes

Stephen Hayes is a senior writer at The Weekly Standard in Washington, DC, and author of two New York Times bestsellers. He writes frequently on electoral politics and national security.

Juan Williams

Juan Williams joined FOX News in 1997 as a political contributor. He is a regular panelist on FOX Broadcasting's Sunday morning public affairs program, "FOX News Sunday."

Read his bio

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This is a rush transcript of "Special Report With Bret Baier" from August 4, 2010. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: July job numbers reflect in part expected losses related to the census winding down. But the fact is, we've now added private sector jobs every month this year instead of losing them as we did for the first seven months of last year.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CHRIS WALLACE, ANCHOR: President Obama putting the best face today on what are generally considered disappointing job numbers for July. And let's bring in our panel: Steven Hayes of The Weekly Standard; Jennifer Loven, chief White House correspondent for the Associated Press, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer.

So, let's take a look at the July numbers behind the 9.5 percent overall unemployment rate. Let's put them up on the screen: As you can see -- 143,000 census jobs that ended, temporary jobs and were ended as expected. Private employers added just 71,000 jobs. Overall, 131,000 jobs lost last month.

Steve, what is all of that tell you about the state of this recovery?

STEVE HAYES, WEEKLY STANDARD: Well, I think the first thing to be said is that we didn't fall off a cliff. Things did not get dramatically worse in this -- in these job numbers. But they're not good. I mean, the 71,000 number is interesting, but we'll see if it's 71,000 when we look at these numbers in a month.

Remember, we just had the June number, the private sector June number revised down to 31,000.

WALLACE: Eighty thousand to 30,000.

HAYES: That's pretty --that's a pretty big drop. So, we'll see if the 71,000 number is what it is.

But the president -- I mean, I give the guy credit for going out and continuing to try to make the argument. I suppose he doesn't have much of a choice at this point, but he's getting to the point where he's, you know, he's touting these things that are slivers of good news against this vast array of bad numbers and bad news day after day after day. And he's out touting batteries or signs, or, you know, pointing -- trying to point to anything that can give him a boost. I think it's very tough and it's getting tougher.

WALLACE: Yes. Jennifer, political experts generally say that voters make up their mind several months before the election of what the state of the economy is. We're now several months before the election. I mean, this is the decision time when people's opinions are firming up.

How worried are they when they continue to see these not very encouraging numbers and see just how tepid this recovery is?

JENNIFER LOVEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS: Well, I think you can tell how worried they are by what Steve rightly pointed to, a sort of a tortured explanation that you hear from the president, right? You have these numbers, he picks out a thin sliver of good news and, you know, couches it correctly in all the bad news. And it doesn't add up to very much, right?

And the White House realizes that they have before them is a very hard sell, which is it's not as bad as it could be. That's not the kind of slogan that wins elections and they realize that that's a really tough thing for him to go out and say.

What they're hoping is that he can continue to talk about what little bits of good news there is and talk about the things that could have happened that didn't and his ideas for trying to create more jobs. Some of which are being opposed by Republicans and that that will be --

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE: And the other argument they're making is, hey, it's not as bad as it was. In the old days, they drove us into a ditch, we're getting us out.

continued...

< 1 2 3 4 5> adsonar_placementId=1499753;adsonar_pid=150758;adsonar_ps=-1;adsonar_zw=612;adsonar_zh=140;adsonar_jv='ads.adsonar.com'; Show Transcripts

Choose a category

The Grapevine The GrapevineBrit Hume's CommentaryAll-Star Panelist Interviews

Latest Transcript

August 06, 2010

Please click on a date for previous transcripts:

Loading Datepicker Monday on Special Report

Republicans are expected to offer a special resolution in hopes of assuring Democrats won't hold a lame duck session after the midterms.  We'll follow the back-and-forth.

Exclusive Interview With President Obama

• Part 1: Obama on health care

• Part 2: Obama on foreign policy

• Read the transcript

Special Report Poll Take Our Poll(polls) Special Report Online

Every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. ET After the Show

Join our live-streaming webcast and chat, for the reactions you didn’t hear from the panel, and a chance for you to weigh in with your thoughts and questions LIVE.

Connect with Special Report MyspaceFacebookTwitterEmailAudio PodcastPanel Podcast All-Star Panelists -- Monday, August 9 Charles Krauthammer

Krauthammer writes a syndicated column for The Washington Post. He is also a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington.

Stephen Hayes

Stephen Hayes is a senior writer at The Weekly Standard in Washington, DC, and author of two New York Times bestsellers. He writes frequently on electoral politics and national security.

Juan Williams

Juan Williams joined FOX News in 1997 as a political contributor. He is a regular panelist on FOX Broadcasting's Sunday morning public affairs program, "FOX News Sunday."

Read his bio

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(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: July job numbers reflect in part expected losses related to the census winding down. But the fact is, we've now added private sector jobs every month this year instead of losing them as we did for the first seven months of last year.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CHRIS WALLACE, ANCHOR: President Obama putting the best face today on what are generally considered disappointing job numbers for July. And let's bring in our panel: Steven Hayes of The Weekly Standard; Jennifer Loven, chief White House correspondent for the Associated Press, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer.

So, let's take a look at the July numbers behind the 9.5 percent overall unemployment rate. Let's put them up on the screen: As you can see -- 143,000 census jobs that ended, temporary jobs and were ended as expected. Private employers added just 71,000 jobs. Overall, 131,000 jobs lost last month.

Steve, what is all of that tell you about the state of this recovery?

STEVE HAYES, WEEKLY STANDARD: Well, I think the first thing to be said is that we didn't fall off a cliff. Things did not get dramatically worse in this -- in these job numbers. But they're not good. I mean, the 71,000 number is interesting, but we'll see if it's 71,000 when we look at these numbers in a month.

Remember, we just had the June number, the private sector June number revised down to 31,000.

WALLACE: Eighty thousand to 30,000.

HAYES: That's pretty --that's a pretty big drop. So, we'll see if the 71,000 number is what it is.

But the president -- I mean, I give the guy credit for going out and continuing to try to make the argument. I suppose he doesn't have much of a choice at this point, but he's getting to the point where he's, you know, he's touting these things that are slivers of good news against this vast array of bad numbers and bad news day after day after day. And he's out touting batteries or signs, or, you know, pointing -- trying to point to anything that can give him a boost. I think it's very tough and it's getting tougher.

WALLACE: Yes. Jennifer, political experts generally say that voters make up their mind several months before the election of what the state of the economy is. We're now several months before the election. I mean, this is the decision time when people's opinions are firming up.

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