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Panel on the Berwick Recess Appointment

By Special Report w/Bret Baier, Special Report w/Bret Baier - July 7, 2010

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Special Guests | Steve Hayes, Kirsten Powers, Charles Krauthammer

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(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

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ROBERT GIBBS, WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY: There are aspects of the health care law that have to be implemented on a timeline that I'm sure many who oppose Dr. Berwick for political reasons didn't want to see implemented. We are not going to have the viewpoints of a few hold up the law of the land.

 

(END VIDEO CLIP)

SHANNON BREAM, GUEST HOST: That's the White House spokesman Robert Gibbs today talking about Dr. Donald Berwick who is now the subject of a recess appointment by President Obama to head up the centers for Medicare and Medicaid.

 

Also, we have someone to talk about that saying -- this is Max Baucus, the senator who heads up the finance committee. This would have been the committee that would have had the hearing had it gone through Dr. Berwick.

 

He said: "Senate confirmation of presidential appointees is an essential process provided by the Constitution that serves as a check on executive power." That is coming from a Democrat.

 

To talk about this, let's bring in our panel, Steve Hayes, senior writer for the Weekly Standard, also Kirsten Powers, columnist of The New York Post, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer. Welcome to all of you.

 

Charles, let's start with you. Recess appointments, everybody does them.

 

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: It is routine and it's done when you think your nominee is not going to make it. Here I think it was done for other reasons, but there is nothing illegal or underhanded about it. I just object that the language the administration used to defend it because it's entirely disingenuous as we shall explain in a minute.

 

BREAM: Kirsten, your take on this? The nomination hasn't been before the Senate for that long and a number of people on both sides of the aisle say we were just getting through the vetting process.

KIRSTEN POWERS, COLUMNIST, NEW YORK POST: I don't think the Democrats want to bring him up precisely because he will get in a huge debate over the health care policy, which Democrats don't want to do.

 

I'm a big fan of transparency. I like people to have the hearings. Democrats and Republicans do this, but it's an abuse of the recess process and it was an abuse when George Bush did it with John Bolton or whoever else because recess appointment were really supposed to be back in the day when they had long recesses and were gone for six or seven months and you couldn't leave anything open.

 

But let's face it -- they're in recess for two weeks, so it's not necessary.

 

BREAM: Steve, did he jump the gun and abuse the process?

 

STEVE HAYES, SENIOR WRITER, THE WEEKLY STANDARD: Of course it was. It's not just that they wanted to avoid a debate. I agree with Kirsten on that. It was they wanted to avoid a specific debate avoiding Berwick's ideas.

 

The thing he said in the past, the long list of the opposition research that the Republicans can and did produce about the kinds of things he advocated for single-payer health care plans consistently to making strong anti-market forces are precisely the kind of things that Republicans warned about for about a year during the actual health care debate, saying this was a step to socialize medicine and saying it would lead to single payer.

 

Here you've got somebody who is going to run an agency in the CMF that is going to oversee half a trillion dollars in cuts to Medicare and add 16 million people to Medicaid rolls and he made the arguments that the Republicans worried Democrats would make at the time.

 

BREAM: You all alluded to the politics of why the pick now. Let's have a couple of other quotes. This comes from President Obama in nominating him or actually appointing him about Dr. Berwick. He said, "It's unfortunate at a time when the nation is facing enormous challenges many in Congress have decided to delay critical nominations for political purposes."

 

On the other side of the aisle, Senator Barrasso said: "This appointment shows incredible arrogance on part of the president and it makes a mockery of his promise to run a transparent administration."

 

continued...

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President Obama takes to the campaign trail once again as he heads to Missouri and Nevada. The International Monetary Fund has some recommendations for the U.S. Government. We'll have the latest on the case of those Russian spies. And we'll take a look at whether the administration's new health care law will save money for you, and for the federal government.

 

Only On FoxNews.com

 

Read: Lawyer Who Defended 'American Taliban' Now Heads DOJ Lawsuit Against Arizona

 

 

 

 

Read: Past Spy Swaps Between U.S. & Russia

Exclusive Interview With President Obama

• Part 1: Obama on health care

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• Read the transcript

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Join our live-streaming webcast and chat, for the reactions you didn’t hear from the panel, and a chance for you to weigh in with your thoughts and questions LIVE.

Connect with Special Report MyspaceFacebookTwitterEmailAudio PodcastPanel Podcast All-Star Panelists -- Thursday, July 8 Charles Krauthammer

Krauthammer writes a syndicated column for The Washington Post. He is also a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington.

A.B. Stoddard

A.B. Stoddard, an associate editor and columnist at The Hill newspaper, has covered the U.S. Congress since 1994. She is also a regular contributor to The Hill's Pundit's Blog. Stoddard was awarded a first place 2010 Dateline Award by the Society of Professional Journalists for her columns on President Obama's first year in office.

Stephen Hayes

Stephen Hayes is a senior writer at The Weekly Standard in Washington, DC, and author of two New York Times bestsellers. He writes frequently on electoral politics and national security.

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(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ROBERT GIBBS, WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY: There are aspects of the health care law that have to be implemented on a timeline that I'm sure many who oppose Dr. Berwick for political reasons didn't want to see implemented. We are not going to have the viewpoints of a few hold up the law of the land.

 

(END VIDEO CLIP)

SHANNON BREAM, GUEST HOST: That's the White House spokesman Robert Gibbs today talking about Dr. Donald Berwick who is now the subject of a recess appointment by President Obama to head up the centers for Medicare and Medicaid.

 

Also, we have someone to talk about that saying -- this is Max Baucus, the senator who heads up the finance committee. This would have been the committee that would have had the hearing had it gone through Dr. Berwick.

 

He said: "Senate confirmation of presidential appointees is an essential process provided by the Constitution that serves as a check on executive power." That is coming from a Democrat.

 

To talk about this, let's bring in our panel, Steve Hayes, senior writer for the Weekly Standard, also Kirsten Powers, columnist of The New York Post, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer. Welcome to all of you.

 

Charles, let's start with you. Recess appointments, everybody does them.

 

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: It is routine and it's done when you think your nominee is not going to make it. Here I think it was done for other reasons, but there is nothing illegal or underhanded about it. I just object that the language the administration used to defend it because it's entirely disingenuous as we shall explain in a minute.

 

BREAM: Kirsten, your take on this? The nomination hasn't been before the Senate for that long and a number of people on both sides of the aisle say we were just getting through the vetting process.

KIRSTEN POWERS, COLUMNIST, NEW YORK POST: I don't think the Democrats want to bring him up precisely because he will get in a huge debate over the health care policy, which Democrats don't want to do.

 

I'm a big fan of transparency. I like people to have the hearings. Democrats and Republicans do this, but it's an abuse of the recess process and it was an abuse when George Bush did it with John Bolton or whoever else because recess appointment were really supposed to be back in the day when they had long recesses and were gone for six or seven months and you couldn't leave anything open.

 

But let's face it -- they're in recess for two weeks, so it's not necessary.

 

BREAM: Steve, did he jump the gun and abuse the process?

 

STEVE HAYES, SENIOR WRITER, THE WEEKLY STANDARD: Of course it was. It's not just that they wanted to avoid a debate. I agree with Kirsten on that. It was they wanted to avoid a specific debate avoiding Berwick's ideas.

 

The thing he said in the past, the long list of the opposition research that the Republicans can and did produce about the kinds of things he advocated for single-payer health care plans consistently to making strong anti-market forces are precisely the kind of things that Republicans warned about for about a year during the actual health care debate, saying this was a step to socialize medicine and saying it would lead to single payer.

 

Here you've got somebody who is going to run an agency in the CMF that is going to oversee half a trillion dollars in cuts to Medicare and add 16 million people to Medicaid rolls and he made the arguments that the Republicans worried Democrats would make at the time.

 

BREAM: You all alluded to the politics of why the pick now. Let's have a couple of other quotes. This comes from President Obama in nominating him or actually appointing him about Dr. Berwick. He said, "It's unfortunate at a time when the nation is facing enormous challenges many in Congress have decided to delay critical nominations for political purposes."

 

On the other side of the aisle, Senator Barrasso said: "This appointment shows incredible arrogance on part of the president and it makes a mockery of his promise to run a transparent administration."

 

continued...

< 1 2 3> adsonar_placementId=1499753;adsonar_pid=150758;adsonar_ps=-1;adsonar_zw=612;adsonar_zh=140;adsonar_jv='ads.adsonar.com'; Show Transcripts

Choose a category

The Grapevine The GrapevineBrit Hume's CommentaryAll-Star Panelist Interviews

Latest Transcript

July 07, 2010

Please click on a date for previous transcripts:

Loading Datepicker Wednesday on Special Report

President Obama takes to the campaign trail once again as he heads to Missouri and Nevada. The International Monetary Fund has some recommendations for the U.S. Government. We'll have the latest on the case of those Russian spies. And we'll take a look at whether the administration's new health care law will save money for you, and for the federal government.

 

Only On FoxNews.com

 

Read: Lawyer Who Defended 'American Taliban' Now Heads DOJ Lawsuit Against Arizona

 

 

 

 

Read: Past Spy Swaps Between U.S. & Russia

Exclusive Interview With President Obama

• Part 1: Obama on health care

• Part 2: Obama on foreign policy

• Read the transcript

Special Report Poll Take Our Poll(polls) Special Report Online

Every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. ET After the Show

Join our live-streaming webcast and chat, for the reactions you didn’t hear from the panel, and a chance for you to weigh in with your thoughts and questions LIVE.

Connect with Special Report MyspaceFacebookTwitterEmailAudio PodcastPanel Podcast All-Star Panelists -- Thursday, July 8 Charles Krauthammer

Krauthammer writes a syndicated column for The Washington Post. He is also a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington.

A.B. Stoddard

A.B. Stoddard, an associate editor and columnist at The Hill newspaper, has covered the U.S. Congress since 1994. She is also a regular contributor to The Hill's Pundit's Blog. Stoddard was awarded a first place 2010 Dateline Award by the Society of Professional Journalists for her columns on President Obama's first year in office.

Stephen Hayes

Stephen Hayes is a senior writer at The Weekly Standard in Washington, DC, and author of two New York Times bestsellers. He writes frequently on electoral politics and national security.

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ROBERT GIBBS, WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY: There are aspects of the health care law that have to be implemented on a timeline that I'm sure many who oppose Dr. Berwick for political reasons didn't want to see implemented. We are not going to have the viewpoints of a few hold up the law of the land.

 

(END VIDEO CLIP)

SHANNON BREAM, GUEST HOST: That's the White House spokesman Robert Gibbs today talking about Dr. Donald Berwick who is now the subject of a recess appointment by President Obama to head up the centers for Medicare and Medicaid.

 

Also, we have someone to talk about that saying -- this is Max Baucus, the senator who heads up the finance committee. This would have been the committee that would have had the hearing had it gone through Dr. Berwick.

 

He said: "Senate confirmation of presidential appointees is an essential process provided by the Constitution that serves as a check on executive power." That is coming from a Democrat.

 

To talk about this, let's bring in our panel, Steve Hayes, senior writer for the Weekly Standard, also Kirsten Powers, columnist of The New York Post, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer. Welcome to all of you.

 

Charles, let's start with you. Recess appointments, everybody does them.

 

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: It is routine and it's done when you think your nominee is not going to make it. Here I think it was done for other reasons, but there is nothing illegal or underhanded about it. I just object that the language the administration used to defend it because it's entirely disingenuous as we shall explain in a minute.

 

BREAM: Kirsten, your take on this? The nomination hasn't been before the Senate for that long and a number of people on both sides of the aisle say we were just getting through the vetting process.

KIRSTEN POWERS, COLUMNIST, NEW YORK POST: I don't think the Democrats want to bring him up precisely because he will get in a huge debate over the health care policy, which Democrats don't want to do.

 

I'm a big fan of transparency. I like people to have the hearings. Democrats and Republicans do this, but it's an abuse of the recess process and it was an abuse when George Bush did it with John Bolton or whoever else because recess appointment were really supposed to be back in the day when they had long recesses and were gone for six or seven months and you couldn't leave anything open.

 

But let's face it -- they're in recess for two weeks, so it's not necessary.

 

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