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Putin Vows Terrorists 'Will Be Destroyed'

By Mark Memmott, NPR - March 29, 2010

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6:53

March 29, 2010

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By Mark Memmott

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has vowed that the "terrorists" responsible for suicide bombings in Moscow's subway system today "will be destroyed," Reuters reports.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Reuters adds, "ordered senior officials to fight terrorism 'without hesitation, to the end,' after female suicide bombers killed at least 37 people at two Moscow metro stations."

The Associated Press says more than 100 people were wounded. The wire service writes that 24-year-old Alexander Vakulov, who said he was on a train on the platform opposite the targeted train at the Park Kultury station, said he "heard a bang, turned my head and smoke was everywhere. People ran for the exits screaming."

The AP adds that:

"The first explosion took place just before 8 a.m. at the Lubyanka station in central Moscow. The station is underneath the building that houses the main offices of the Federal Security Service, or FSB, the KGB's main successor agency."A second explosion hit the Park Kultury station about 45 minutes later."The head of Russia's main security agency said preliminary investigation places the blame on rebels from the restive Caucasus region that includes Chechnya, where separatists have fought Russian forces since the mid-1990s."

From Moscow, Peter Van Dyk filed this report. As he notes, the Moscow metro is one of the busiest in the world:

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Reuters also has a video report here.

And the AP has posted this "raw video" report:

Update at 7:30 a.m. ET. On Morning Edition, journalist Jessica Gollaher told host Renee Montagne that "people are, quite frankly, very panicked" by the bombings:

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Update at 9:20 a.m. ET. A U.S. reaction. From New York, the Associated Press reports that:

The nation's largest transit agency has beefed up security as a precaution following the suicide bombing in Moscow's subway system. A spokesman for New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Kevin Ortiz, says the agency has a "heightened security presence" as a result. He declined further comment.

Update at 10:20 a.m. ET: The government-funded, English-language Russia Today channel has posted this interview with one of its correspondents who was on the scene. And, this clip includes video she says she took at the scene:

There are photos from people who were caught in the mayhem on the LifeNews.ru website.

(H/T to The Lede.)

categories: Foreign News, Terrorism

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< previous post next post > hosts Frank James Mark Memmott What is 'The Two-Way'?

This is NPR's news blog. It's a place to come for breaking news, analysis and for stories that are just too interesting — or too entertaining — to pass up.

It's also a place for conversation about the news; we're counting on you to keep us honest. But please read the discussion rules before diving in.

The blog is hosted by Mark Memmott and Frank James, in collaboration with Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

You can learn more about The Two-Way, including the origin of its name, on the "Welcome" page.

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March 29, 2010

comments

By Mark Memmott

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has vowed that the "terrorists" responsible for suicide bombings in Moscow's subway system today "will be destroyed," Reuters reports.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Reuters adds, "ordered senior officials to fight terrorism 'without hesitation, to the end,' after female suicide bombers killed at least 37 people at two Moscow metro stations."

The Associated Press says more than 100 people were wounded. The wire service writes that 24-year-old Alexander Vakulov, who said he was on a train on the platform opposite the targeted train at the Park Kultury station, said he "heard a bang, turned my head and smoke was everywhere. People ran for the exits screaming."

The AP adds that:

From Moscow, Peter Van Dyk filed this report. As he notes, the Moscow metro is one of the busiest in the world:

Reuters also has a video report here.

And the AP has posted this "raw video" report:

Update at 7:30 a.m. ET. On Morning Edition, journalist Jessica Gollaher told host Renee Montagne that "people are, quite frankly, very panicked" by the bombings:

Update at 9:20 a.m. ET. A U.S. reaction. From New York, the Associated Press reports that:

Update at 10:20 a.m. ET: The government-funded, English-language Russia Today channel has posted this interview with one of its correspondents who was on the scene. And, this clip includes video she says she took at the scene:

There are photos from people who were caught in the mayhem on the LifeNews.ru website.

(H/T to The Lede.)

categories: Foreign News, Terrorism

6:53 - March 29, 2010

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Please note that all comments must adhere to the NPR.org discussion rules and terms of use. See also the Community FAQ.

NPR reserves the right to read on the air and/or publish on its Web site or in any medium now known or unknown the e-mails and letters that we receive. We may edit them for clarity or brevity and identify authors by name and location. For additional information, please consult our Terms of Use.

Recent FirstOldest FirstMost Recommended

View all comments »

< previous post next post > hosts Frank James Mark Memmott What is 'The Two-Way'?

This is NPR's news blog. It's a place to come for breaking news, analysis and for stories that are just too interesting — or too entertaining — to pass up.

It's also a place for conversation about the news; we're counting on you to keep us honest. But please read the discussion rules before diving in.

The blog is hosted by Mark Memmott and Frank James, in collaboration with Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

You can learn more about The Two-Way, including the origin of its name, on the "Welcome" page.

Hourly News Summary

Five minutes of NPR news, updated hourly.

» Get the Podcast

Contact 'The Two-Way'

You can drop us a line via our contact form.

categories About The Two-Way Accidents and Disasters Afghanistan All Things Considered Animals Art Bush Years Business Congress Consumer Safety Crime Culture Economy Education Energy Entertainment Environment Food Foreign News Foreign Policy Fun Government Haiti Health History Homeland Security Hosts' Recommendations Immigration Iran Iraq Justice Legal Media Military Morning Edition Morning Roundup NPR People National Intelligence National News Nature News Media Obama Administration Obituaries Pakistan Politics Polls Religion Science Society Sports Supreme Court Technology Tell Me More Terrorism Transportation Travel Weather Weekend Edition Winter Olympics Related News Feeds The Two-Way

More about News Feeds »

The Two-Way - Breaking News, Analysis archive March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 July 2009 June 2009 May 2009 search The Two-Way - Breaking News, Analysis Reading The Baseline Scenario BBC News The Daily Dish The Huffington Post The Lede memeorandum On Deadline Politico Pro Publica The Swamp   npr always on Newsletters Podcasts Mobile RSS Feeds Widgets API Radio news U.S. World Opinion Politics Business Technology Science Health Sports arts & life Books Movies Pop Culture Food Performing Arts Games & Humor music Concerts You Must Hear This Interviews & Profiles Music News Music Blogs Rock/Pop/Folk Jazz & Blues Classical Browse Artists A-Z All Songs Considered From The Top JazzSet Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz Mountain Stage Song of the Day The Thistle & Shamrock World Cafe World Of Opera programs a-z Morning Edition All Things Considered Fresh Air The Diane Rehm Show On The Media On Point Talk of the Nation Tell Me More Weekend Edition Saturday Weekend Edition Sunday Car Talk Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! listen Hourly News NPR Program Stream Schedule Find Station Streams more Multimedia Columns Blogs Analysis Commentary NPR Ombudsman Topic Index Sponsor NPR NPR Shop About NPR Jobs & Training Press Releases Copyright year = new Date(); document.write(year.getFullYear()); NPR Terms of Use Privacy Policy Permissions Corrections Text-Only Site Help Contact Us Donate Our partner in public broadcasting

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