Polls

Year

State

Type

Results

Select one or more years, states and race types, then click "Apply Filter" to see results.
Arrow
Advanced Search
Find Any Poll

Election 2016 — Republican Delegate Count

|

GOP Delegate Count, Map | GOP Popular Vote | Dem Delegate Count, Map | Dem Popular Vote | Latest 2016 Polls

1,237 Needed to Win
Loading
Colorado1, Wyoming1
Delegates in Colorado are selected through a process that starts with the March 1st caucuses and culminates at the state convention on April 9th. Colorado Delegates can go to the national convention as unbound or bound to a candidate. The Wyoming precinct caucuses on March 1st do not bind any delegates, but they start a delegate selection process that culminates at the state convention on April 14-16. Delegates from Wyoming can be bound or unbound.
Open**
Republicans and Independents can vote in these primaries, but Democrats can't.
* — Threshold
Candidates have to reach a certain level of support to earn delegates
10% threshold: New Hampshire, Minnesota, Kansas, Maine, Rhode Island
20% threshold: Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Louisiana, Puerto Rico, Idaho, New York, Connecticut, Washington
15% threshold: Arkansas, Oklahoma, Michigan, Mississippi, District of Columbia, Utah, New Mexico
5% threshold: Massachusetts, Kentucky
13% threshold: Alaska
# — Ceiling
Candidates can win all at-large or all delegates by surpassing a certain level of support.
The ceiling is 50 percent in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Oklahoma, Texas, Vermont, Maine, Puerto Rico, Idaho, Michigan, Utah, New York and Connecticut.
The ceiling is 66 percent in Tennessee.
The ceiling is 85 percent in Minnesota.
If a candidate reaches the ceiling in Alabama, Oklahoma, New York, Tennessee or Texas, he or she earns all the at-large delegates from the state.
If a candidate reaches the ceiling in Georgia, Minnesota, Vermont, Maine, Puerto Rico, Idaho, Michigan, Utah or Connecticut, he or she earns all the at-large and congressional district delegates from the state.
Arkansas: every candidate who gets over 15 percent gets one at-large delegate. If no candidate gets over 50 percent, the remaining delegates are allocated proportionally among those who get over 15 percent. If a candidate gets over 50 percent, he or she gets the remaining at-large delegates.
▽ — Congressional District Delegates
Congressional district delegates are allocated according to results in that district rather than statewide. The rules are the same for the at-large and congressional delegates (e.g. same floor, same ceiling, proportional or WTA, etc.) in most states. Here are the states in which they differ significantly and the ways in which they differ:
Arkansas — the congressional district delegates are allocated proportionally with no threshold, unless a candidate gets over 50 percent of the vote in that district. In that case they get all three delegates.
Georgia and Minnesota — There's no ceiling in the congressional districts.
Louisiana — There's no threshold in the congressional districts.
Mississippi — There's not threshold in the congressional districts and if a candidate gets over 50 percent of the vote in a district, he or she gets all the delegates from that district.
Illinois and Pennsylvania — at-large delegates are WTA by statewide vote, but congressional district delegates are elected directly. Pennsylvania's congressional district delegates are officially unbound.
Missouri — Nine at-large delegates are allocated to the statewide winner, and five delegates are allocated to the winner of each congressional district. If a candidate gets over 50 percent he or she gets all the delegates.
Connecticut — Plurality winner in each congressional district gets all three delegates.
Rhode Island — If three candidates get over 10 percent in a congressional district, they each get one delegate. If any candidate gets over 67 percent in a district, they get all three delegates.
Washington — if a candidate gets over 50 percent in a congressional district, he or she wins all three delegates. If only two candidates are above the threshold in a district, the highest vote-getter receives two delegates and the second highest receives one. If three candidates are above the threshold, each one gets a delegate.